Herpes viruses in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease

New Scientist

The most in-depth analysis of human brain tissue ever done in Alzheimer's disease has found evidence for the controversial theory that viruses play a role in the condition. If true, it could mean that some instances of Alzheimer's might be treated with anti-viral drugs. Alzheimer's is the most common cause of dementia, affecting some 47 million people worldwide.


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#artificialintelligence

Out of the total number, 48 were scans of people with the disease, while 48 were scans of people who suffered from mild cognitive impairment and eventually developed full-blown Alzheimer's. The AI was able to diagnose Alzheimer's 86 percent of the time. More importantly, it was able to detect mild cognitive impairment 84 percent of the time, making it a potentially effective tool for early diagnosis. With more samples and further development, though, the AI could become more accurate until it's reliable enough to be used as a non-invasive early detection system.


Patients With Rare Form of Alzheimer's Participate in Study

U.S. News

After the first year, the university won federal funding -- about $75,000 a year -- to continue hosting the conference, which is held the weekend before and in the same city as the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference, the world's largest forum for dementia researchers. The Alzheimer's Association also donates $100,000 annually to support the family conference.


5 Siblings Worry About Developing Alzheimer's Like Parents

U.S. News

Her grandmother is neither the first nor the last in this Colorado family to suffer from the degenerative brain disorder. Five family members across at least two generations of the family have had Alzheimer's disease. And a sixth family member, Nelson's great-grandmother, was diagnosed with what was called "forgetfulness" before her death in 1976.


My marriage was tested -- and my wife proved who she really was

FOX News

My brain did it again. I had completed 7 months of a grueling treatment for a neurological disorder that had plagued me for several years. I just had these 20-second episodes where I couldn't read or write, and sometimes it made it hard for me to speak. After finishing the treatment and making some changes to my medication, the episodes nearly stopped. I would occasionally experience light symptoms, which shouldn't have mattered.