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WattTime, Carbon Tracker, and Google Team Up to Measure Global Power Plant Emissions - The Planetary Press

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On May 7th, WattTime announced a new project in collaboration with Carbon Tracker, Google, and the World Resources Institute (WRI). The project will quantify carbon emissions from all of the world's largest power plants by utilizing AI technology. Data collected will be made available in a public database. The data is intended to hold the polluting plants accountable to environmental standards and enable advanced new emissions reduction technologies. But through the growing power of AI, our little coalition of nonprofits is about to lift that veil all over the world, all at once," said Gavin McCormick, Executive Director of WattTime. "To think that today a little team like ours can use emerging AI remote sensing techniques to hold every powerful polluter worldwide accountable is pretty incredible.


How AI and satellites can help cut emissions One Earth Initiative

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Why are coal plants in the U.S. and Europe closing at an accelerating rate, while in Asia, coal consumption went up and helped fuel an overall 1.7% year-on-year increase in global carbon emissions? Part of the reason coal continues to grow in countries like China and India is that in these areas, unlike in the U.S., emissions data can be shoddy or hard to acquire. Without accurate information it is harder to hold facilities accountable and keep them in line with meeting emission reduction targets. To address this situation, we are partnering with WattTime and the World Resources Institute (WRI), to launch a new project which will use satellite imagery to quantify carbon emissions from every major power plant across the world. This effort is being funded as one of 20 projects in the Google AI Impact Challenge.


AI Weekly: What ML practitioners are doing about climate change

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A lot happened this week in the AI space. The Guardian wrote an article with GPT-3 and again demonstrated that no matter what OpenAI paid to train and create the language model, the free marketing might be worth more. After losing the JEDI cloud contract appeal with the Pentagon, Amazon appointed to its board Keith Alexander, who oversaw the National Security Agency mass surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden leaks in 2013. And Portland passed the strictest facial recognition bans in U.S. history, outlawing government and business use of the technology. However, AI Weekly attempts to reach into the zeitgeist and highlight the issues on people's minds. This week without question it's the smoke that has hung over the western United States and the underlying problem of climate change.


AI Weekly: What ML practitioners are doing about climate change

#artificialintelligence

A lot happened this week deserving of attention in the AI space. The Guardian wrote an article with GPT-3 and again demonstrated that no matter what OpenAI paid to train and create the language model, the free marketing might be worth more. After losing the JEDI cloud contract appeal with the Pentagon, Amazon appointed Keith Alexander to its board -- the man who oversaw the National Security Agency mass surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden leaks in 2013. And Portland passed the strictest facial recognition bans in U.S. history, outlawing government and business use of the technology. However, AI Weekly attempts to reach into the zeitgeist and highlight important events on people's minds. This week without question it's the smoke that's hung over the western United States and the underlying issue of climate change.


Artificial Intelligence and Satellite Technology to Enhance Carbon Tracking Measures

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New carbon emission tracking technology will quantify emissions of greenhouse gas, holding the energy industry accountable for its CO2 output. Backed by Google, this cutting-edge initiative will be known as Climate TRACE (Tracking Real-Time Atmospheric Carbon Emissions). Advanced AI and machine learning now make it possible to trace greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from factories, power plants and more. By using image processing algorithms to detect carbon emissions from power plants, AI technology makes use of the growing global satellite network to develop a more comprehensive global database of power plant activity. Because most countries self-report emissions and manually compile results, scientists often rely on data that is several years out of date.