Google Assistant can order around LG's connected appliances

Engadget

LG has placed its trust on Google Assistant and has given it the power to control its smart appliances. While it teamed up with Amazon earlier this year to give its refrigerators built-in access to Alexa, its partnership with Google is much bigger in scale. Now, you can control any of the company's 87 WiFi-connected smart home appliances by barking out orders through a Google Home speaker or through a compatible iOS or Android smartphone. Once you're done setting voice control up through LG's SmartThinQ app, you can use commands within a Home speaker's range or through a phone to tell your fridge to make more ice or to tell your AC to adjust the temperature. If you have an LG washing machine, you can ask Assistant how much time is still left before your load is done.


From Echo to Ring doorbell and Fire TV, are you comfortable Amazon with controlling your smart home?

USATODAY

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Amazon acquired another startup this week, the maker of the beloved tech product Eero, a mesh router that improves dead Wi-Fi spots in the home. To that, you might have said, OK, so? But, more importantly, it's an indication of how Amazon wants to go further than just making our homes "smart." It wants to turn our dwellings into the "Amazon Home."


Experimenting with Intelligent Apps: Our Voice-Controlled Shopping Assistant for Smart Fridge

@machinelearnbot

Intelligent personal assistants have the real potential to transform our daily lives in the nearest future. At least this is what Gartner says in its report on the Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017. For businesses, this means an excellent opportunity to refine their offers and improve customer experience, providing smarter and more effective ways to handle routine tasks. The great thing about Intelligent apps is that they can become integrated with almost every area of a customer's life. Over the last few years, more and more smart connected devices have been hitting the market, and all these gadgets are usually augmented with digital conversational interfaces.


News roundup - Google opens Early Access beta testing to more developers

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to DeveloperEconomics' weekly news roundup. In this edition, Google cancels its modular smartphone project, Apple plans to delete abandoned apps from the App Store and Epic releases a new version of Unreal Engine 4. Read on for the full news rundown. Google has expanded its Early Access beta testing, allowing any developer apply for the program. Previously, Early Access was only available to 29 hand-picked developers, who got to test out their apps with early-adopters (although other devs were given different testing options). Google says the Early Access program generated over 1 million beta installs since launching in May and "demand is only growing."


Predicting Appropriate Semantic Web Terms from Words

AAAI Conferences

The Semantic Web language RDF was designed to unambiguously define and use ontologies to encode data and knowledge on the Web. Many people find it difficult, however, to write complex RDF statements and queries because doing so requires familiarity with the appropriate ontologies and the terms they define. We describe a system that suggests appropriate RDF terms given semantically related English words and general domain and context information. We use the Swoogle Semantic Web search engine to provide RDF term and namespace statistics, the WorldNet lexical ontology to find semantically related words, and a naïve Bayes classifier to suggest terms. A customized graph data structure of related namespaces is constructed from Swoogle's database to speed up the classifier model learning and prediction time.