Inside Facebook's Biggest Artificial Intelligence Project Ever

#artificialintelligence

The next time you load Facebook, whether its website or one of its mobile applications, consider the computing muscle it takes to load the personal updates, news stories, and family photos you see on your screen. Now multiply that by one billion users. Now do it every single day. To run Facebook FB isn't just to operate the social network of a company that landed at No. 242 on last year's Fortune 500. It's also to run the racks and racks of computing infrastructure necessary to serve it up--the processors and memory and software necessary to know what you want to see, where you want to see it, when you want to see it. Facebook serves one-fifth of the world's population and more than half of the roughly 3.2 billion people estimated to be Internet users at the end of last year.


Inside Facebook's Biggest Artificial Intelligence Project Ever

#artificialintelligence

The next time you load Facebook, whether its website or one of its mobile applications, consider the computing muscle it takes to load the personal updates, news stories, and family photos you see on your screen. Now multiply that by one billion users. Now do it every single day. To run Facebook FB isn't just to operate the social network of a company that landed at No. 242 on last year's Fortune 500. It's also to run the racks and racks of computing infrastructure necessary to serve it up--the processors and memory and software necessary to know what you want to see, where you want to see it, when you want to see it.


How AI became Instagram's weapon of choice in the war on cyberbullying

#artificialintelligence

On a platform meant to be a safe place to share snapshots of users' lives, Instagram has the greatest cyberbullying problem of all social media sites. But instead of putting the responsibility on their users to report abuse, as Facebook and Twitter have done, Instagram is the first social media outlet to use machine learning to eliminate abusive language on its platform.


Facebook's image recognition can now tell what you're wearing

Mashable

Facebook's search tool is about to get way more visual. Director of Applied Machine Learning Joaquin Candela published a blog post today (accompanying his presentation at the Machine Learning @Scale event in New York City) to share updates about Facebook's AI-based image-recognition tool. The improvements can hone in on photos to the "pixel level" and will let users search images based on their content -- whether or not they've been manually tagged. "Until recently, online search has always been a text-driven technology, even when searching through images," he writes. "Whether an image was discoverable was dependent on whether it was sufficiently tagged or had the right caption -- until now."


Facebook's Latest Solution To Fake News? More Machines, Baby

#artificialintelligence

Take a shot every time Facebook evades editorial accountability. On Thursday, Facebook announced that it is going to use "updated machine learning" algorithms in order to better spot and counter misinformation on its platform. The company says it will use its existing third-party fact checkers to review stories that the new algorithm flags, and their reports may be shown below flagged stories in a section called Related Articles. The Related Articles feature -- a list of suggested links offering varying perspectives -- is technically not new. Facebook started publicly testing the feature in April, but now the company is rolling out the feature more widely in the US, Germany, France, and Netherlands, TechCrunch reported on Thursday.