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Artificial Intelligence can't technically invent things, says patent office

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is the future. If "Westworld" or "Black Mirror" are to be believed, there will soon come a day when the computers rule us all. But for now, an AI's power ends at the US Patent Office. The USPTO has denied a pair of patents filed on behalf of DABUS, an artificial intelligence system, and published a ruling that says US patents can only be granted to "natural persons." The two patents were for a food container and a flashlight, and were filed by Stephen Thaler, an AI researcher and DABUS' creator.


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#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is the future. If "Westworld" or "Black Mirror" are to be believed, there will soon come a day when the computers rule us all. But for now, an AI's power ends at the US Patent Office. The USPTO has denied a pair of patents filed on behalf of DABUS, an artificial intelligence system, and published a ruling that says US patents can only be granted to "natural persons." The two patents were for a food container and a flashlight, and were filed by Stephen Thaler, an AI researcher and DABUS' creator.


Artificial Intelligence can't technically invent things, says patent office

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is the future. If "Westworld" or "Black Mirror" are to be believed, there will soon come a day when the computers rule us all. The USPTO has denied a pair of patents filed on behalf of DABUS, an artificial intelligence system, and published a ruling that says US patents can only be granted to "natural persons." The two patents were for a food container and a flashlight, and were filed by Stephen Thaler, an AI researcher and DABUS' creator. According to the filing from the USPTO, Thaler calls DABUS a "creativity machine" and wanted the AI to get full credit for the inventions.


US office the latest to deny patents where AI system listed as inventor

AIHub

Last summer it was reported that patents had been filed in the USA and Europe listing an artificial intelligence system as the inventor. The patents in question were for a food container and a warning light and were filed by Stephen Thaler on behalf of DABUS (an AI system). Those applications have been considered, and on 22 April the US patent and trademark office (USPTO) reached the same verdict as the UK and European offices, denying the patents. In his application Thaler asserted that the inventions were generated by DABUS (which he dubs a "creativity machine"), and that the system was not created to solve any particular problem. He claims it was, therefore, the machine, not a person, that recognised the novelty of the invention.


US patent office rules that artificial intelligence cannot be a legal inventor

#artificialintelligence

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has ruled that artificial intelligence systems cannot be credited as an inventor in a patent, the agency announced earlier this week. The decision came in response to two patents -- one for a food container and the other for a flashing light -- that were created by an AI system called DABUS. Among the USPTO's arguments is the fact that US patent law repeatedly refers to inventors using humanlike terms such as "whoever" and pronouns like "himself" and "herself." The group behind the applications had argued that the law's references to an inventor as an "individual" could be applied to a machine, but the USPTO said this interpretation was too broad. "Under current law, only natural persons may be named as an inventor in a patent application," the agency concluded.