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Advisory panel in works to speed up review of Japan defense guidelines

The Japan Times

An advisory panel will be set up to expedite the review of the national defense buildup guidelines toward the year-end deadline, according to a source. The National Defense Program Guidelines establish the defense capability objectives that Japan should achieve over the next decade. The panel, which will include defense experts and academics, will discuss strengthening Japan's defense capabilities in space, cyberspace and electronic warfare, the source said. The Defense Ministry aims to compile a revised version of the National Defense Program Guidelines based on the panel's discussions and get the Cabinet to sign off on it by the end of this year. The panel's first meeting might be held Wednesday.


The global landscape of AI ethics guidelines

#artificialintelligence

In the past five years, private companies, research institutions and public sector organizations have issued principles and guidelines for ethical artificial intelligence (AI). However, despite an apparent agreement that AI should be'ethical', there is debate about both what constitutes'ethical AI' and which ethical requirements, technical standards and best practices are needed for its realization. To investigate whether a global agreement on these questions is emerging, we mapped and analysed the current corpus of principles and guidelines on ethical AI. Our results reveal a global convergence emerging around five ethical principles (transparency, justice and fairness, non-maleficence, responsibility and privacy), with substantive divergence in relation to how these principles are interpreted, why they are deemed important, what issue, domain or actors they pertain to, and how they should be implemented. Our findings highlight the importance of integrating guideline-development efforts with substantive ethical analysis and adequate implementation strategies.


AI must be accountable, EU says as it sets ethical guidelines - Reuters

#artificialintelligence

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Companies working with artificial intelligence need to install accountability mechanisms to prevent its being misused, the European Commission said on Monday, under new ethical guidelines for a technology open to abuse. AI projects should be transparent, have human oversight and secure and reliable algorithms, and they must be subject to privacy and data protection rules, the commission said, among other recommendations. The European Union initiative taps in to a global debate about when or whether companies should put ethical concerns before business interests, and how tough a line regulators can afford to take on new projects without risking killing off innovation. "The ethical dimension of AI is not a luxury feature or an add-on. It is only with trust that our society can fully benefit from technologies," the Commission digital chief, Andrus Ansip, said in a statement.


Brexit: EU draft guidelines say British exit talks come first before anything else

FOX News

BRUSSELS – The guidelines that European Union Council President Donald Tusk is putting to EU members make it clear that withdrawal from the bloc comes ahead of any new relationship with Britain even though the rough outlines such a relationship may partially overlap. In the draft guidelines obtained by the Associated Press, it says that first the EU and Britain must "settle the disentaglement" of Britain from the EU but added that "an overall understanding on the framework for the future relationship could be identified during the second phase of the negotiations under Article 50." The guidelines also say the issue of citizens living in each other's countries is a priority, and call for "flexible and imaginative solutions" for the issue of the U.K.'s land border with Ireland.


International Guidelines for Ethical AI

#artificialintelligence

In the last two months, i.e. in April and May 2019, both the EU Commission and the OECD published guidelines for trustworthy and ethical Artificial Intelligence (AI). In both cases, these are only guidelines and, as such, are not legally binding. Both sets of guidelines were compiled by experts in the field. Let's have a closer look. "Why do we need guidelines for trustworthy, ethical AI?" you may ask.