UCSF, NVIDIA join to research AI use in medical imaging

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UC San Francisco is upping its research into advanced computing in healthcare, launching an artificial intelligence center specifically to advance its use in medical imaging. The Center for Intelligent Imaging will develop and apply artificial intelligence in the quest to find new ways to use radiology to look inside the body and to evaluate health and disease. UCSF investigators in the center will work with Santa Clara, Calif-based NVIDIA, which develops AI products to support infrastructure and tools. The collaboration will aim to create new ways to enable the translation of AI into clinical practice. "Artificial intelligence represents the next frontier for diagnostic medicine," says Christopher Hess, MD, chair of UCSF's Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging.


Google's DeepMind to use AI in diagnosing eye disease

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

A scan of a human eye. SAN FRANCISCO -- Google plans to use more than one million anonymized eye scans to teach computers how to diagnose ocular disease. The Menlo Park, Calif.-based company has signed a deal with a British eye hospital to use artificial intelligence to learn from the medical records of 1.6 million patients in London hospitals. The goal is to teach a computer program to recognize the signs of two common types of eye disease, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. That's something humans are surprisingly imperfect at.


Google's DeepMind to use AI in diagnosing eye disease

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The artificial intelligence software is learning how to recognize early signs of two eye diseases.Video provided by Newsy Newslook A scan of a human eye. SAN FRANCISCO -- Google plans to use more than one million anonymized eye scans to teach computers how to diagnose ocular disease. The Menlo Park, Calif.-based company has signed a deal with a British eye hospital to use artificial intelligence to learn from the medical records of 1.6 million patients in London hospitals. The goal is to teach a computer program to recognize the signs of two common types of eye disease, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. That's something humans are surprisingly imperfect at.


AI is better than humans at classifying heart anatomy on ultrasound scan

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Artificial intelligence is already set to affect countless areas of your life, from your job to your health care. New research reveals it could soon be used to analyze your heart. AI could soon be used to analyze your heart. A study published Wednesday found that advanced machine learning is faster, more accurate and more efficient than board-certified echocardiographers at classifying heart anatomy shown on an ultrasound scan. The study was conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, the University of California, Berkeley, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.


Google AI predicts hospital inpatient death risks with 95% accuracy

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Using raw data from the entirety of a patient's electronic health record, Google researchers have developed an artificial intelligence network capable of predicting the course of their disease and risk of death during a hospital stay, with much more accuracy than previous methods. The deep learning models were trained on over 216,000 deidentified EHRs from more than 114,000 adult patients, who had been hospitalized for at least one day at either the University of California, San Francisco or the University of Chicago. For those two academic medical centers, the AI predicted the risks of mortality, readmission and prolonged stays, as well as discharge diagnoses, by ICD-9 code. The network was 95% accurate in predicting a patient's risk of dying while in the hospital--with a much lower rate of false alerts--than the traditional regressive model--the augmented Early Warning Score--which measures 28 factors and was about 85% accurate at the two centers. The researchers' findings were published last month in the Nature journal npj Digital Medicine.