Introduction to Anomaly Detection using Machine Learning with a Case Study

#artificialintelligence

A common need when you are analyzing real-world data-sets is determining which data point stand out as being different to all others data points. Such data points are known as anomalies. This article was originally published on Medium by Davis David. In this article, you will learn a couple of Machine Learning-Based Approaches for Anomaly Detection and then show how to apply one of these approaches to solve a specific use case for anomaly detection (Credit Fraud detection) in part two. A common need when you analyzing real-world data-sets is determining which data point stand out as being different to all others data points.


Anomaly Detection

#artificialintelligence

Anomaly Detection is the identification of rare occurrences, items, or events of concern due to their differing characteristics from majority of the processed data. Anomalies, or outliers as they are also called, can represent security errors, structural defects, and even bank fraud or medical problems. There are three main forms of anomaly detection. The first type of anomaly detection is unsupervised anomaly detection. This technique detects anomalies in an unlabeled data set by comparing data points to each other, establishing a baseline "normal" outline for the data, and looking for differences between the points.


Experimental Comparison of Online Anomaly Detection Algorithms

AAAI Conferences

Anomaly detection methods abound and are used extensively in streaming settings in a wide variety of domains. But a strength can also be a weakness; given the vast number of methods, how can one select the best method for their application? Unfortunately, there is no one best way for all domains. Existing literature is focused on creating new anomaly detection methods or creating large frameworks for experimenting with multiple methods at the same time. As the literature continues to grow, extensive evaluation of every available anomaly detection method is not feasible. To reduce this evaluation burden, in this paper we present a framework to intelligently choose the optimal anomaly detection methods based on the characteristics the time series displays. We provide a comprehensive experimental validation of multiple anomaly detection methods over different time series characteristics to form guidelines. Applying our framework can save time and effort by surfacing the most promising anomaly detection methods instead of experimenting extensively with a rapidly expanding library of anomaly detection methods.


Time-Series Anomaly Detection Service at Microsoft

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Large companies need to monitor various metrics (for example, Page Views and Revenue) of their applications and services in real time. At Microsoft, we develop a time-series anomaly detection service which helps customers to monitor the time-series continuously and alert for potential incidents on time. In this paper, we introduce the pipeline and algorithm of our anomaly detection service, which is designed to be accurate, efficient and general. The pipeline consists of three major modules, including data ingestion, experimentation platform and online compute. To tackle the problem of time-series anomaly detection, we propose a novel algorithm based on Spectral Residual (SR) and Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). Our work is the first attempt to borrow the SR model from visual saliency detection domain to time-series anomaly detection. Moreover, we innovatively combine SR and CNN together to improve the performance of SR model. Our approach achieves superior experimental results compared with state-of-the-art baselines on both public datasets and Microsoft production data.


Sequential Feature Explanations for Anomaly Detection

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In many applications, an anomaly detection system presents the most anomalous data instance to a human analyst, who then must determine whether the instance is truly of interest (e.g. a threat in a security setting). Unfortunately, most anomaly detectors provide no explanation about why an instance was considered anomalous, leaving the analyst with no guidance about where to begin the investigation. To address this issue, we study the problems of computing and evaluating sequential feature explanations (SFEs) for anomaly detectors. An SFE of an anomaly is a sequence of features, which are presented to the analyst one at a time (in order) until the information contained in the highlighted features is enough for the analyst to make a confident judgement about the anomaly. Since analyst effort is related to the amount of information that they consider in an investigation, an explanation's quality is related to the number of features that must be revealed to attain confidence. One of our main contributions is to present a novel framework for large scale quantitative evaluations of SFEs, where the quality measure is based on analyst effort. To do this we construct anomaly detection benchmarks from real data sets along with artificial experts that can be simulated for evaluation. Our second contribution is to evaluate several novel explanation approaches within the framework and on traditional anomaly detection benchmarks, offering several insights into the approaches.