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'Faster with AI': Indonesia to replace ministerial aides with machines

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President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo has said the government will replace some civil service positions with artificial intelligence, instructing ministers to remove two ranks of public servants. "I have ordered ministers to replace echelon III and IV officials with AI [because] our bureaucracy will be faster with AI, but it would depend on the omnibus law," the president said in Jakarta on Thursday, adding that doing so would cut red tape. He referred to a planned law that would synchronize more than 70 overlapping laws and regulations. Jokowi said the current four echelon tiers would be reduced to two by next year as AI was set to replace top civil service posts. He, however, did not elaborate on how the government would go about the plan.


Indonesia aims to replace some top civil service jobs with AI in 2020

#artificialintelligence

JAKARTA: Indonesian President Joko Widodo on Thursday (Nov 28) ordered government agencies to remove two ranks of public servants in 2020 and replace their roles with artificial intelligence, in a bid to cut red tape hampering investment. Widodo made the remarks in a room full of leaders of big companies as he laid out a second-term agenda aimed at changing the structure of Southeast Asia's largest economy by reducing its reliance on natural resources. The president, whose new five-year term began last month after winning an election in April, said Indonesia should transition to higher-end manufacturing, such as electric vehicles and use raw materials like coal and bauxite in such industries, not just exports. Such transformation would require foreign investment and Widodo said he would improve the business climate by fixing dozens of overlapping rules and cutting red tape. To reduce bureaucracy, Widodo said the current top four tiers in government agencies would be flattened to two next year.


Indonesia aims to replace some top civil service jobs with AI in 2020 The Guardian

#artificialintelligence

JAKARTA (Reuters) - Indonesian President Joko Widodo on Thursday ordered government agencies to remove two ranks of public servants in 2020 and replace their roles with artificial intelligence, in a bid to cut red tape hampering investment. Widodo made the remarks in a room full of leaders of big companies as he laid out a second-term agenda aimed at changing the structure of Southeast Asia's largest economy by reducing its reliance on natural resources. The president, whose new five-year term began last month after winning an election in April, said Indonesia should transition to higher-end manufacturing, such as electric vehicles and use raw materials like coal and bauxite in such industries, not just exports. Such transformation would require foreign investment and Widodo said he would improve the business climate by fixing dozens of overlapping rules and cutting red tape. To reduce bureaucracy, Widodo said the current top four tiers in government agencies would be flattened to two next year.


Indonesia turns to AI to shrink the bloated civil service

#artificialintelligence

Indonesia's infamous red tape has been a persistent barrier to foreign investment into the country. Jokowi is embracing artificial intelligence (AI) as a potential solution. In a bid to cut red tape and strengthen the flow of foreign investment into Indonesia, President Joko Widodo, affectionately known as Jokowi, has ordered its government agencies to flatten the civil service from four tiers to two and adopt artificial intelligence (AI) to replace jobs where possible. The move is part of the president's strategy to push for investment and bureaucratic reform. Jokowi, whose second five-year term began in October, has found gross domestic product (GDP) growth stubborn, hovering around 5% since he took office.


Indonesia to vet public servants to identify Islamists

The Japan Times

JAKARTA - Indonesia plans to tighten vetting of senior public servants amid fears that hard-line Islamist ideology has permeated high levels of government, according to documents reviewed by Reuters and a senior official involved in the plan. Indonesia is officially secular, but there has been a rise in politicians demanding a larger role for Islam in the world's biggest Muslim-majority country, with some groups calling for an Islamic state. The rise in conservatism was a major test for President Joko Widodo in the April election, with some Islamist groups accusing him of being anti-Islam and throwing their support behind political rivals, including challenger Prabowo Subianto. Widodo was re-elected for a second term but voting patterns revealed deepening divisions between areas known for a moderate following of Islam and conservative Muslim regions that backed Prabowo. The senior government official, who is part of a team formulating the new vetting policy, said Widodo intends it to be a part of his legacy of ensuring Indonesia remains a model for moderate Islam.