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The new commute: How driverless cars, hyperloop, and drones will change our travel plans

#artificialintelligence

Articles about technology and the future of transportation rarely used to get far without mentioning jetpacks: a staple of science fiction from the 1920s onwards, the jetpack became a reality in the 1960s in the shape of devices such as the Bell Rocket Belt. But despite many similar efforts, the skies over our cities remain stubbornly free of jetpack-toting commuters. For a novel form of transport to make a material difference to our lives, several key requirements must be satisfied. Obviously the new technology must work safely, and operate within an appropriate regulatory framework. But public acceptance and solid business models are also vital if a new idea is to move from R&D lab to testbed to early adoption, and eventually into mainstream usage.


Switching gears, BlackBerry opens autonomous vehicle hub

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BlackBerry's track record for mobile security and leadership in automotive software makes moving into autonomous driving research a natural fit, the company's chief executive John Chen said Monday at the opening of a new research centre in Kanata, Ont. "Autonomous vehicles require software that is extremely sophisticated and highly secure," Chen said. "Our innovation track record in mobile security and our demonstrated leadership in automotive software make us ideally suited to dominate the market for embedded intelligence in the cars of the future." Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attended the launch of the Autonomous Vehicle Innovation Centre (AVIC) by the Waterloo, Ont.-based smartphone pioneer. "With the opening of its innovation centre in Ottawa, BlackBerry is helping to establish our country as the global leader in software and security for connected car and autonomous vehicle development," Trudeau said.


Where Are Driverless Cars Taking Industry? - Insurance Thought Leadership

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Because of self-driving, KPMG predicts that auto insurance will shrink 60% by 2050 and an additional 10% over the following decade. While more than half of individuals surveyed by Pew Research express worry over the trend toward autonomous vehicles, and only 11% are very enthusiastic about a future of self-driving cars, lack of positive consumer sentiment hasn't stopped several industries from steering into the auto pilot lane. The general sentiment of proponents, such as Tesla and Volvo, is that consumers will flock toward driverless transportation once they understand the associated safety and time-saving benefits. Because of the self-driving trend, KPMG currently predicts that the auto insurance market will shrink 60% by the year 2050 and an additional 10% over the following decade. What this means for P&C insurers is change in the years ahead. A decline in individual drivers would directly correlate to a reduction in demand for the industry's largest segment of coverage.


Tech and the future of transportation: From here to there

ZDNet

Articles about technology and the future of transportation rarely used to get far without mentioning jet-packs: a staple of science fiction from the 1920s onwards, the jet pack became a reality in the 1960s in the shape of devices such as the Bell Rocket Belt. But despite many similar efforts, the skies over our cities remain stubbornly free of jet-pack-toting commuters.


Why the blockchain technology offers the perfect infrastructure for self-driving cars

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In 2014, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) classified the future of automobile in 6 levels (from 0 to 5). Car makers have managed to develop self-driving cars stepping into level 3 (conditional automation: autonomous under certain conditions) and soon challenging level 4 (high automation: the driver can take control of the car if necessary) and 5 (full automation: the driver is not required at all) using a combination of cutting edge technologies such as captors, sensors, radars, and other visual systems used for mapping, localization, and obstacle avoidance. Today, sensors such as LIDAR, GPS, or IMU are used to gather information around the car that will be processed for the car to react accordingly. These technologies have allowed companies to push self-driving cars to the market but self-driving cars are yet still in the testing phase and there are major challenges to overcome before thinking of reaching full autonomy. As of today, self-driving cars still have challenges to tackle concerning communication and security.