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Nvidia AI turns sketches into photorealistic landscapes in seconds

#artificialintelligence

Today at Nvidia GTC 2019, the company unveiled a stunning image creator. Using generative adversarial networks, users of the software are with just a few clicks able to sketch images that are nearly photorealistic. The software will instantly turn a couple of lines into a gorgeous mountaintop sunset. This is MS Paint for the AI age. Called GauGAN, the software is just a demonstration of what's possible with Nvidia's neural network platforms.


Attemping to Generate Photorealistic Video With Neural Networks

#artificialintelligence

Over the past decade, we've seen great strides made in the area of AI and neural networks. When trained appropriately, they can be coaxed into generating impressive output, whether it be in text, images, or simply in classifying objects. There's also much fun to be had in pushing them outside their prescribed operating region, as [Jon Warlick] attempted recently. It's capable of generating pseudo-photorealistic images of landscapes from segmentation maps, where different colors of a 2D image represent things such as trees, dirt, or mountains, or water. After spending much time toying with the software, [Jon] decided to see if it could be pressed into service to generate video instead.


Nvidia unveils incredible 'smart paintbrush' software that uses AI to turn simple doodles into art

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new piece of software developed by American tech company, NVIDIA, uses deep-learning to elevate even the roughest sketches into works of art. The new program, dubbed GauGAN, after famous French impressionist Paul Gaugin, uses a tool called generative adversarial networks (GAN) to interpret simple lines and convert them into hyper-realistic images. Its application could help professionals across a range of disciplines such as architecture and urban planning render images and visualizations faster and with greater accuracy, according to the company. A new piece of software developed by American tech company, NVIDIA, uses deep-learning to elevate even the roughest sketches into works of art. Simple shapes become mountains and lakes with just a stroke of what NVIDIA calls a'smart paintbrush' Artificial intelligence systems rely on neural networks, which try to simulate the way the brain works in order to learn.


GauGAN Turns Doodles into Stunning, Realistic Landscapes NVIDIA Blog

#artificialintelligence

A novice painter might set brush to canvas aiming to create a stunning sunset landscape -- craggy, snow-covered peaks reflected in a glassy lake -- only to end up with something that looks more like a multi-colored inkblot. But a deep learning model developed by NVIDIA Research can do just the opposite: it turns rough doodles into photorealistic masterpieces with breathtaking ease. The tool leverages generative adversarial networks, or GANs, to convert segmentation maps into lifelike images. The interactive app using the model, in a lighthearted nod to the post-Impressionist painter, has been christened GauGAN. GauGAN could offer a powerful tool for creating virtual worlds to everyone from architects and urban planners to landscape designers and game developers.


GauGAN Turns Doodles into Stunning, Realistic Landscapes NVIDIA Blog

#artificialintelligence

A novice painter might set brush to canvas aiming to create a stunning sunset landscape -- craggy, snow-covered peaks reflected in a glassy lake -- only to end up with something that looks more like a multi-colored inkblot. But a deep learning model developed by NVIDIA Research can do just the opposite: it turns rough doodles into photorealistic masterpieces with breathtaking ease. The tool leverages generative adversarial networks, or GANs, to convert segmentation maps into lifelike images. The interactive app using the model, in a lighthearted nod to the post-Impressionist painter, has been christened GauGAN. GauGAN could offer a powerful tool for creating virtual worlds to everyone from architects and urban planners to landscape designers and game developers.