Art From Artificial Intelligence: Computer-Generated Works Now Up For Sale

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Two paintings up for auction in New York highlight a growing interest in artificial intelligence-created works -- a technique that could transform how art is made and viewed but is also stirring up passionate debate. The art world was stunned last year when an AI painting sold for $432,500, and auctioneers are keen to further test demand for computer-generated works. "Art is a true reflection of what our society, what our environment responds to," said Max Moore of Sotheby's. "And so it's just a natural continuation of the progression of art," he added. Sotheby's will put two paintings by the French art collective Obvious up for sale on Thursday, including "Le Baron De Belamy."


Art meets tech: AI-generated paintings to go under hammer in New York

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NEW YORK: Two paintings up for auction in New York highlight a growing interest in artificial intelligence-created works - a technique that could transform how art is made and viewed but is also stirring up passionate debate. The art world was stunned last year when an AI painting sold for $432,500, and auctioneers are keen to further test demand for computer-generated works. "Art is a true reflection of what our society, what our environment responds to," said Max Moore of Sotheby's. "And so it's just a natural continuation of the progression of art," he added. Sotheby's will put two paintings by the French art collective Obvious up for sale on Thursday, including'Le Baron De Belamy'.


Artwork creates unique AI-painted portraits that DISAPPEAR and are never created again

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Art-lovers staring at these portraits will be the first, and last, to ever do so. The creation is the first self-generative AI artwork to go to auction created and only the second piece of art to be sold that uses AI. Artificial intelligence generates the images from scratch and produces an endless sequence of unique male and female portraits that have never been seen before and will never appear again. It is called Memories of Passersby 1, and is set to go to auction at Sotheby's in London on March 6 with an estimated value of between £30,00 and £40,000. Two screens are attached to a retro-style wooden sideboard which contains the AI'brain' and this produces the endless stream of art with a male-like image and a feminine image on separate displays.


Artificial Intelligence and Intercultural Dialogue

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The exhibition is organized by The State Hermitage Museum and The Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF), Russia's sovereign wealth fund, within The Hermitage 20/21 project. It will be launched during this year's St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) and will be a part of the forum's cultural program. Fourteen artists and creative teams from ten different countries are taking part in the exhibition. AI technology is used to process large bulks of data, including images. In the last few years, the use of AI has helped to achieve revolutionary results in cybersecurity, banking and marketing due to the facial recognition technology.


Christie's Is First to Sell Art Made by Artificial Intelligence, But What Does That Mean?

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On Thursday, the AI-generated "Portrait of Edmond Belamy" sold for $432,500--some 45 times its estimated value--in a sale trumpeted by Christie's as the first auction to feature work created by artificial intelligence. It's a moment likely to be marked in the timeline of both AI and art history, but what, exactly, does the sale signify? For the AI community, the Verge's James Vincent writes in the days preceding the bidding war, the auction provoked controversy among those who argued that the humans behind the canvas (a trio of 25-year-olds best known as the Paris-based art collective Obvious) relied heavily on 19-year-old Robbie Barrat's algorithms yet failed to sufficiently credit him. If the work was truly authored by this string of numbers and letters, does it matter who built and trained the AI? And, given the relatively blurred, imprecise vision the portrait--which Vulture art critic Jerry Saltz scathingly describes as "100 percent generic"--offers of its dour-looking subject, does "Edmond Belamy" even deserve a place in the art history canon? There are no straightforward answers to these questions.