I finally believe in Microsoft's mixed reality vision

Engadget

For years, Microsoft has been talking about its dream of mixed reality -- the idea that AR and VR headsets can work together in harmony across virtual and physical environments. But until now, it really has just been talk. At its Build developer conference this week, I finally saw a mixed reality demo that made Microsoft's ambitious vision seem achievable. It was more than just shared VR -- something we've seen plenty of already -- it was a group experience that brought together HoloLens and Acer's virtual-reality headsets in intriguing ways. To be clear, I was running through Microsoft's Mixed Reality Academy at Build, a simplified version of a developer class meant for journalists and analysts.


This HTC Vive and HoloLens hack combines VR and AR for true 'mixed reality'

Mashable

Virtual reality and augmented reality are still just becoming fully baked experiences. But a new experiment could merge the two technologies into something that's genuinely exciting. A software developer managed to take an HTC Vive headset (VR) and a Microsoft HoloLens headset (AR) and connect the two with an app, which allows users of both to interact with each other in mixed reality. Using Microsoft's HoloLens developer kit, Drew Gottlieb, who is studying at the Rochester Institute of Technology, created an app called the HoloViveObserver. It gives a HoloLens user the ability to observe or take over -- in real time -- a VR project from a Vive user.


Hands-on: How HoloLens handles creating shared experiences

PCWorld

Late in the day on Wednesday, Microsoft gave a handful of press members at its Build developer conference a sneak peek at the HoloLens hardware it began shipping to developers that same day. The "Holographic Academy" aimed to get a group of about 70 journalists from a simple canvas to a working holographic application in just an hour, through a guided tour of the development tools for Microsoft's new augmented reality headgear. Since last year, the HoloLens hardware has remained largely unchanged. Microsoft remained committed to a visor that's supported by an adjustable headband that wraps around a user's head. It's designed to distribute the HoloLens's weight over users' heads and shoulders, rather than weighing down their faces like other augmented reality headsets.


Hands-on: How HoloLens handles creating shared experiences

PCWorld

Late in the day on Wednesday, Microsoft gave a handful of press members at its Build developer conference a sneak peek at the HoloLens hardware it began shipping to developers that same day. The "Holographic Academy" aimed to get a group of about 70 journalists from a simple canvas to a working holographic application in just an hour, through a guided tour of the development tools for Microsoft's new augmented reality (AR) headgear. In the end, we were left with a fascinating glimpse into what Microsoft has in store for its AR headset. Since last year, the HoloLens hardware has remained largely unchanged. Microsoft remained committed to a visor that's supported by an adjustable headband that wraps around a user's head.


Microsoft is letting other companies build HoloLens devices

Engadget

A consumer HoloLens "may come from us, or it may come from a partner, and either way that's fantastic," said Microsoft's Terry Myerson, executive vice president of its Windows and Devices Group. Myerson likens HoloLens to Microsoft's Surface -- a concept that will inspire other companies to create similar devices. The Surface had a rough start, but it's evolved into surprisingly compelling hardware, and now just about every PC maker is trying to get in on that action. To give us a sense of what a world full of HoloLens devices could look like, Microsoft played a short video during its Computex keynote. It featured a young designer who used a HoloLens headset to design an event space virtually.