Eight films to watch out for at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival

Los Angeles Times

An old man (Jonathan Pryce) is convinced he is Don Quixote, and mistakes Toby (Adam Driver), an advertising executive, for his trusty squire, Sancho Panza. Despite encountering some legal trouble early in the festival, the Terry Gilliam-directed film will serve as the closing-night screening.


Jarmusch bewitches Cannes with poetic 'Paterson'

U.S. News

Jim Jarmusch has debuted his distinctive bus driver-poet drama "Paterson" at the Cannes Film Festival. Festival goers responded enthusiastically Monday to the gentle rhythms of the film, which is competing for the Palme d'Or. In the movie, Adam Driver plays a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey, who writes poetry inspired by conversations he overhears. The film, too, has a rhyming, internal tempo, full of everyday repetitions and is populated by twins in the background. Jarmusch acknowledged even he struggles to describe the film's combination of working-class and creative life, inspired partly by the Paterson poet and doctor William Carlos Williams.


Will Smith, Paolo Sorrentino Join Cannes Film Festival Jury

U.S. News

FILE - In this combination photo, actor Will Smith attends the world premiere of "Suicide Squad" on Aug. 1, 2016, in New York, left, and Jessica Chastain attends the premiere of "The Son" on April 3, 2017, in Los Angeles. Smith, Chastain and and Italian director Paolo Sorrentino are joining the jury for the 70th Cannes Film Festival. The Cannes Film Festival runs May 17-28.


Russian drama takes the stage at Cannes in the sweet 'Leto' and the scathing 'Donbass'

Los Angeles Times

And so when Serebrennikov's "Leto" premiered in competition on Wednesday night, its 48-year-old director was represented only by a sign bearing his name, carried by his collaborators as they walked up the red carpet and made their way into the Grand Théâtre Lumière. If Serebrennikov's absence cast an inescapable pall over what should have been a celebratory evening, it also lent a subdued resonance to his lovely, wistful new movie: Far from an angry political screed, it feels both removed from its fraught larger context and shrewdly, poignantly attuned to it.


Stubborn? Arrogant? Irrelevant? The 2018 Cannes Film Festival weathers the storm

Los Angeles Times

I have my own treasure trove of memories of Pierre. Receiving a DVD box set of Maurice Tourneur crime pictures in the mail from Pierre, including "Justin de Marseille" (1935), which became his nickname for me thereafter. Having lunch with him at Chinese restaurants (always, always Chinese restaurants) in Paris and Toronto, which he began, as he did most conversations, with the same inquiry: "What new pictures have you seen?" Running into him at Cannes in 2014, mere minutes after the mind-blowing world premiere of Godard's 3D marvel "Goodbye to Language." "Did you like it?" he asked.