IBM's Watson supercomputer discovers 5 new genes linked to ALS

#artificialintelligence

IBM Watson is known for its work in identifying cancer treatments and beating contestants on Jeopardy! But now the computing system has expertise in a new area of research: neuroscience. Watson discovered five genes linked to ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrig's disease, IBM announced on Wednesday. The tech company worked with researchers at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. The discovery is Watson's first in any type of neuroscience, and suggests that Watson could make discoveries in research of other neurological diseases.


What Would the Big Data From Your Brain Tell You? - DZone Big Data

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Amongst his other amazing projects, Elon Musk wants to help hook us up to our brains. According to a recent report in The Wall Street Journal, he is backing an operation called Neuralink, which is experimenting with putting electrodes in our brains to enhance their function. The benefits for a whole variety of conditions are obvious, but it poses a question: Is this venture into brain technology the start of the next space race? We have conquered many parts of our exterior world, but with lightning-fast improvements in AI technology, will human brains now be in a race to keep up with their robot AI cousins? This "neural lace" technology has so many real-world applications, and it could eventually mean that an entirely different "class" of people emerges -- but I would just like to ask the question whether it would be entirely healthy to have intimate access to every single thought that has ever crossed our mind.


What Would the Big Data from Your Brain Tell You? Big Cloud Recruitment

#artificialintelligence

Amongst his other amazing projects, Elon Musk wants to help hook us up to our brains. According to a recent report in the Wall Street Journal, he is backing an operation called Neuralink, which is experimenting with putting electrodes in our brains to enhance their function. Is this venture into brain technology the start of the next space race? We have conquered many parts of our exterior world, but with lightening fast improvements in A.I. technology, will human brains now be in a race to keep up with their robot A.I. cousins? This "neural lace" technology has so many real-world applications, and it could eventually mean that an entirely different "class" of people emerge, but I would just like to ask the question whether it would be entirely healthy to have intimate access to every single thought that has ever crossed our mind?


What Would the Big Data from Your Brain Tell You? Big Cloud Recruitment

#artificialintelligence

Would you really want to know? Amongst his other amazing projects, Elon Musk wants to help hook us up to our brains. According to a recent report in the Wall Street Journal, he is backing an operation called Neuralink, which is experimenting with putting electrodes in our brains to enhance their function. Is this venture into brain technology the start of the next space race? We have conquered many parts of our exterior world, but with lightening fast improvements in A.I. technology, will human brains now be in a race to keep up with their robot A.I. cousins?


A brain signature highly predictive of future progression to Alzheimer's dementia

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Early prognosis of Alzheimer's dementia is hard. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) typically precedes Alzheimer's dementia, yet only a fraction of MCI individuals will progress to dementia, even when screened using biomarkers. We propose here to identify a subset of individuals who share a common brain signature highly predictive of oncoming dementia. This signature was composed of brain atrophy and functional dysconnectivity and discovered using a machine learning model in patients suffering from dementia. The model recognized the same brain signature in MCI individuals, 90% of which progressed to dementia within three years. This result is a marked improvement on the state-of-the-art in prognostic precision, while the brain signature still identified 47% of all MCI progressors. We thus discovered a sizable MCI subpopulation which represents an excellent recruitment target for clinical trials at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease.