President Trump Issues Executive Order Seemingly Aimed at China and Huawei

TIME - Tech

President Donald Trump issued an executive order Wednesday to help protect the United States against foreign adversaries that are taking advantage of technological vulnerabilities to threaten U.S. communications systems. The order, which declared a national emergency in response to the threat, does not name specific countries or companies. But it appears to target Chinese tech giant Huawei, the world's biggest supplier of network gear used by phone and internet companies. Huawei has long been seen as a front for spying by the Chinese military or security services, but the company has denied the allegations. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai applauded Trump's executive order, saying it would safeguard the U.S. communications supply chain.


Huawei hit by US export controls, potential import ban

#artificialintelligence

In a fateful swipe at telecommunications giant Huawei, the Trump administration issued an executive order Wednesday apparently aimed at banning its equipment from U.S. networks and said it was subjecting the Chinese company to strict export controls. Huawei would be the largest business ever subjected to the controls, a law enforcement measure that requires it to obtain U.S. government approval on purchases of American technology, said Kevin Wolf, who had been the assistant secretary of commerce for export administration in the Obama administration. "It's going to have ripple effects through the entire global telecommunications network because Huawei affiliates all over the planet depend on U.S. content to function and if they can't get the widget or the part or the software update to keep functioning then those systems go down," he said. Asked if that could include barring Google from selling its Android operating system, which Huawei uses on its handsets, Wolf said it would be premature to say until he's seen a published order from the Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security to be sure of the scope. The executive order declares a national economic emergency that empowers the government to ban the technology and services of "foreign adversaries" deemed to pose "unacceptable risks" to national security -- including from cyberespionage and sabotage.


Trump's Bizarre Tweet About China and 6G Wireless Tech, Unpacked

Slate

Seemingly out of the blue, Donald Trump weighed in on the future of U.S. wireless technology Thursday morning. I want 5G, and even 6G, technology in the United States as soon as possible. It is far more powerful, faster, and smarter than the current standard. American companies must step up their efforts, or get left behind. There is no reason that we should be lagging behind on.........


Trump issues U.S. tech protection order that appears to target China's Huawei

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump issued an executive order Wednesday to help protect the United States against foreign adversaries that are taking advantage of technological vulnerabilities to threaten U.S. communications systems. The order, which declared a national emergency in response to the threat, does not name specific countries or companies. But it appears to target Chinese tech giant Huawei, the world's biggest supplier of network gear used by phone and internet companies. Huawei has long been seen as a front for spying by the Chinese military or security services, but the company has denied the allegations. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai applauded Trump's executive order, saying it would safeguard the U.S. communications supply chain.


U.S. says it may scale back some Huawei trade restrictions

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Commerce Department said on Friday it may soon scale back restrictions on Huawei Technologies after this week's blacklisting would have made it nearly impossible for the Chinese company to service its existing customers. The Commerce Department, which had effectively halted Huawei's ability to buy American-made parts and components, is considering issuing a temporary general license to "prevent the interruption of existing network operations and equipment," a spokeswoman said. Potential beneficiaries of the license could, for example, include internet access and mobile phone service providers in thinly populated places such as Wyoming and Eastern Oregon that purchased network equipment from Huawei in recent years. In effect, the Commerce Department would allow Huawei to purchase U.S. goods so it can help existing customers maintain the reliability of networks and equipment, but the Chinese firm still would not be allowed to buy American parts and components to manufacture new products. The potential rule roll back suggests changes to Huawei's supply chain may have immediate, far-reaching and unintended consequences.