Artificially intelligent homes for Alzheimer's patients coming: scientists

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Scientists in Toronto are developing an artificial intelligence system that would help people with Alzheimer's disease or other cognitive impairments live safely at home. The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute is working with University of Toronto researchers to make home-based computer systems that would assist elderly people with memory loss in living independently. More than 750,000 Canadians will have Alzheimer's or a related dementia by 2031, according to the researchers. "Often when a person gets moderate to severe levels of impairment, they are taken out of their home and put into a care facility," lead scientist Alex Mihailidis said in a written statement. "We are using artificial intelligence to support aging-in-place so that people can remain in their homes for as long as possible."


17% off Sensi Wi-Fi Programmable Thermostat, Alexa Compatible - Deal Alert

PCWorld

According to Emerson, makers of this UP500W Sensi Wi-Fi Programmable Thermostat, their customers save up to 33% in energy costs every year using programmed heating and cooling schedules. The Sensi thermostat makes it easy to remotely control and schedule the comfort of your home using your phone, tablet or PC. You can start with a preloaded schedule that reflects common daily patterns and quickly adapt it to your unique schedule, or you can use the intuitive swipe controls to build a customized daily schedule in seconds. When your schedule changes, the app gives you continuous control to make adjustments, from across the room or across the world. And because it doesn't require a "C-wire" in most applications, Sensi works with most heating and cooling systems in the US and Canada.


Newswire & Press Release / Detego Showcases New IoT and AI Solutions for Retailers At NRF London - Electronics/Instrumentation/RFID - Enso Detego GmbH

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Detego has been helping a number of global fashion and sportswear brands to get the most out of using RFID and smart devices for achieving near 100 percent inventory accuracy. This has included some pioneering projects involving digital fitting rooms and interactive screens where customers can simply click on a button to automatically request staff bring different sizes or styles without having to return to the shopfloor. Detego's predictive, real-time analytics software into merchandise flow and consumer shopping behavior is part of the Intel-- Retail Sensor Platform ecosystem, a fixed-reader system that continually tracks and monitors the movement of goods around a store. Detego will be a co - exhibitor on Intel--s booth (number 3125). Intel--s CEO Brian Krzanich is a keynote speaker at the NRF conference, being joined by Levis Strauss to talk about how data and smart connected technologies deliver a more personalized shopping experience for customers.


Researchers build undetectable rootkit for programmable logic controllers

PCWorld

Researchers have devised a new malware attack against industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that takes advantage of architectural shortcomings in microprocessors and bypasses current detection mechanisms. The attack changes the configuration of the input/output pins that make up the interface used by PLCs to communicate with other devices such as sensors, valves, and motors. PLCs are specialized embedded computers used to control and monitor physical processes in factories, power stations, gas refineries, public utilities, and other industrial installations. The attack, which will be presented at the Black Hat Europe security conference in London on Thursday, was developed by Ali Abbasi, a doctoral candidate in the distributed and embedded system security group at the University of Twente in the Netherlands, and Majid Hashemi, a research and development engineer at Quarkslab, a Paris-based cybersecurity company. One version of the I/O attack is called pin configuration and involves the use of malicious code that switches an I/O pin's configuration from output to input, or the other way around, without the PLC's OS or programs knowing.


Canadian air traffic controllers send pizza to U.S. colleagues working without pay

Mashable

That includes air traffic controllers, like those working in the New York Air Traffic Control Center, who, while they're still waiting for their paychecks, received a tasty symbol of solidarity from their colleagues across the Canadian border. SEE ALSO: Jimmy Kimmel gives federal employees work during Trump's shutdown Canadian air traffic controllers from the Atlantic province towns of Gander and Moncton ordered pizzas for the crew working at the control center in Ronkonkoma, Long Island on Friday, according to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). Pointed out by the news outlet, a notice was posted up in the hallway of the centre heralding the arrival of 32 pies courtesy of the Canadian Air Traffic Controller Association (CATCA). An image of the notice was posted to Reddit by David Lombardo, a former air traffic controller at the Long Island center, and was posted by other employees on Twitter. Thank you to @CATCA5454 for your generosity!