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An AI System Taught Itself How to Solve the Rubik's Cube in Just 44 Hours

#artificialintelligence

A self-taught artificial intelligence (AI) system called DeepCube has mastered solving the Rubik's Cube puzzle in just 44 hours without human intervention. The system's inventors have detailed their design in a paper titled'Solving the Rubik's Cube Without Human Knowledge'. "A generally intelligent agent must be able to teach itself how to solve problems in complex domains with minimal human supervision," write the paper's authors. "Indeed, if we're ever going to achieve a general, human-like machine intelligence, we'll have to develop systems that can learn and then apply those learnings to real-world applications." While many AI systems have been taught to play games, mastering the complexity of a Rubik's Cube posed a unique set of challenges.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

#artificialintelligence

The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

#artificialintelligence

The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


Solving the Rubik's Cube Without Human Knowledge

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A generally intelligent agent must be able to teach itself how to solve problems in complex domains with minimal human supervision. Recently, deep reinforcement learning algorithms combined with self-play have achieved superhuman proficiency in Go, Chess, and Shogi without human data or domain knowledge. In these environments, a reward is always received at the end of the game, however, for many combinatorial optimization environments, rewards are sparse and episodes are not guaranteed to terminate. We introduce Autodidactic Iteration: a novel reinforcement learning algorithm that is able to teach itself how to solve the Rubik's Cube with no human assistance. Our algorithm is able to solve 100% of randomly scrambled cubes while achieving a median solve length of 30 moves -- less than or equal to solvers that employ human domain knowledge.


Machine Learning Finally Tackles the Rubik's Cube

#artificialintelligence

Deep-learning machines have figured out how to master games like chess or Mortal Kombat. Now, computer scientists at the University of California, Irvine taken things to the third dimension by creating an algorithm that can figure out how to solve a Rubik's Cube, a surprisingly difficult change. "Our algorithm is able to solve 100 percent of randomly scrambled cubes while achieving a median solve length of 30 moves -- less than or equal to solvers that employ human domain knowledge," say the scientists in the abstract to their paper, up on Arvix. The algorithm, called DeepCube, uses what's known as "autodidactic iteration," a form of machine learning developed by the authors of the paper. The big challenge of autodidactic iteration was to allow machines to find their own rewards in solving a puzzle, a goal they can reach.