Huawei equipment is exposing British broadband and phone networks to new security risks

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Huawei equipment could pose a threat to national security, senior British security officials have cautioned. Intelligence experts say they can only provide limited assurances that the Chinese company is not a risk to broadband and phone networks in the UK. The recommendation will be made in an as-yet unpublished annual report signed off by the GCHQ spy agency, according to inside sources. Huawei, one of the world's biggest producer of telecoms systems, is a major supplier of broadband and mobile telephone network equipment in Britain. The latest finding will likely intensify the espionage debate around the Shenzhen-based company, which has come previously under fire in the US and Australia.


Why are countries banning Huawei?

Al Jazeera

On Thursday, Canadian authorities arrested Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer (CFO) of Chinese tech company Huawei. The details of the arrest are still unclear but Meng faces extradition to the United States, according to the Canadian Department of Justice. Following the arrest, both the Chinese embassy, as well as Huawei called for the release of Meng, who is the daughter of the company's founder Ren Zhengfei. Under Ren's leadership, Huawei has become one of the biggest telecommunications companies in the world and has established itself as a leading smartphone manufacturer. But Huawei's expansion from its Chinese roots into the rest of the world has sparked concerns among Western governments over the company's close ties to the Chinese authorities, as well as its willingness to export technologies to countries that are under sanction.


Hobbling Huawei: Inside the U.S. war on China's tech giant

The Japan Times

CANBERRA - In early 2018, in a complex of low-rise buildings in the Australian capital, a team of government hackers was engaging in a destructive digital war game. The operatives -- agents of the Australian Signals Directorate, the nation's top-secret eavesdropping agency -- had been given a challenge. With all the offensive cyber tools at their disposal, what harm could they inflict if they had access to equipment installed in the 5G network, the next-generation mobile communications technology, of a target nation? What the team found, say current and former government officials, was sobering for Australian security and political leaders: The offensive potential of 5G was so great that if Australia were on the receiving end of such attacks, the country could be seriously exposed. The understanding of how 5G could be exploited for spying and to sabotage critical infrastructure changed everything for the Australians, according to people familiar with the deliberations. Mike Burgess, the head of the signals directorate, recently explained why the security of fifth generation, or 5G, technology was so important: It will be integral to the communications at the heart of a country's critical infrastructure- everything from electric power to water supplies to sewage, he said in a March speech at a Sydney research institute.


Hobbling Huawei: Inside the U.S. war on China's tech giant

The Japan Times

CANBERRA - In early 2018, in a complex of low-rise buildings in the Australian capital, a team of government hackers was engaging in a destructive digital war game. The operatives -- agents of the Australian Signals Directorate, the nation's top-secret eavesdropping agency -- had been given a challenge. With all the offensive cyber tools at their disposal, what harm could they inflict if they had access to equipment installed in the 5G network, the next-generation mobile communications technology, of a target nation? What the team found, say current and former government officials, was sobering for Australian security and political leaders: The offensive potential of 5G was so great that if Australia were on the receiving end of such attacks, the country could be seriously exposed. The understanding of how 5G could be exploited for spying and to sabotage critical infrastructure changed everything for the Australians, according to people familiar with the deliberations. Mike Burgess, the head of the signals directorate, recently explained why the security of fifth generation, or 5G, technology was so important: It will be integral to the communications at the heart of a country's critical infrastructure- everything from electric power to water supplies to sewage, he said in a March speech at a Sydney research institute.


Huawei has never had a national security issue: Australia chair

ZDNet

Huawei is the most audited, inspected, reviewed, and critiqued IT company in the world, Australian chair John Lord has said, arguing again for the Chinese technology giant to be allowed to take part in 5G build-outs across the nation. Speaking to the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday, Lord said that Huawei equipment has been used by telcos in Australia for almost 15 years, and there has never been a national security issue. "After every kind of inspection, audit, review, nothing sinister has been found. No wrongdoing, no criminal action or intent, no'back door', no planted vulnerability, and no'magical kill switch'," Lord said. "In fact, in our three decades as a company no evidence of any sort has been provided to justify these concerns by anyone -- ever."