Goto

Collaborating Authors

Was this the last human to beat an AI at Poker? Access AI

#artificialintelligence

Ever since the inception of Artificial Intelligence, humans have been in a constant battle with the modern thinking-machines. AI has touched many industries, by showing outstanding results and even outperforming humans. As statistics show, 62% of millennials aged 17-24 and 35% of people over 55 trust the super abilities and the future of AI. It is also interesting that 71% of people over 50 believe that intelligent virtual assistants will simplify their lives in the future. Meanwhile, the history of the Brains vs AI battle contains many examples of where one defeats the other.


In a casino in Pittsburgh, an AI program is beating poker champions for the first time

#artificialintelligence

The night before his newest poker competition was set to begin, Carnegie Mellon's Tuomas Sandholm and his PhD student Noam Brown sat down to play a little No Limit Texas Hold'em against the main competition: the artificial intelligence program they designed called "Libratus." "I was totally wrecked," Sandholm told The Washington Post. But he is not a serious poker player, so that's not such a big achievement. For the past 13 days, however, Libratus has been facing off against four world-champion poker players in a Pittsburgh casino. If it can beat them like it beat Sandholm, it would be an enormous breakthrough.


University of Alberta poker bot Deepstack defeats Texas Hold 'em pros - Cantech Letter

#artificialintelligence

The University of Alberta's Computer Poker Research Group created DeepStack, an artificial intelligence program that defeated professional human poker players at heads-up, no-limit Texas hold'em. Apart from this win being the first of its kind, it bares significance in assisting to make better medical treatment recommendations to developing improved strategic defense planning, stated DeepStack: Expert-level artificial intelligence in heads-up no-limit poker, which was published in Science. DeepStack brings together approaches involving games of perfect information, meaning both players see what is on the board, and imperfect information, where it reasons while playing, using intuition through learning to reassess its strategy with every decision. Computing scientist Michael Bowling, professor in the University of Alberta's Faculty of Science and principal investigator on the study, said poker has presented an ongoing challenge to artificial intelligence. "It is the quintessential game of imperfect information in the sense that the players don't have the same information or share the same perspective while they're playing," explained Bowling.


Artificial intelligence wrecks poker pros to stack up a profit of $800,000

#artificialintelligence

In yet another episode of man versus machine, an artificial intelligence developed by Carnegie Mellon University has been absolutely dismantling a team of professional poker players, accumulating a staggering lead of almost $800,000. The showdown takes place as part of the "Brains vs. Artificial Intelligence" competition which pits a group of four poker pros against the crafty supercomputer Libratus in a heads-up game of No-Limit Texas Hold'em slated to continue for 120,000 hands. Since January 11 when the contest initially kicked off, the players have now passed the midway point of the the race, having completed almost 65,000 hands in total. What is more intriguing is that so far Libratus has managed to keep an impressive lead over its human opponents, stacking up a profit of $794,392. While the seasoned players originally underestimated the AI, Jimmy Chou, who is one of the pros, told CMU that they've all come to regard the machine as a tremendously tough rival, noting the computer's ability to continuously improve its game.


Artificial intelligence wrecks poker pros to stack up a profit of $800,000

#artificialintelligence

In yet another episode of man versus machine, an artificial intelligence developed by Carnegie Mellon University has been absolutely dismantling a team of professional poker players, accumulating a staggering lead of almost $800,000. The showdown takes place as part of the "Brains vs. Artificial Intelligence" competition which pits a group of four poker pros against the crafty supercomputer Libratus in a heads-up game of No-Limit Texas Hold'em slated to continue for 120,000 hands. Gary Vaynerchuk was so impressed with TNW Conference 2016 he paused mid-talk to applaud us. Since January 11 when the contest initially kicked off, the players have now passed the midway point of the the race, having completed almost 65,000 hands in total. What is more intriguing is that so far Libratus has managed to keep an impressive lead over its human opponents, stacking up a profit of $794,392.