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Visualizing the Loss Landscape of Neural Nets

Neural Information Processing Systems

Neural network training relies on our ability to find "good" minimizers of highly non-convex loss functions. It is well known that certain network architecture designs (e.g., skip connections) produce loss functions that train easier, and well-chosen training parameters (batch size, learning rate, optimizer) produce minimizers that generalize better. However, the reasons for these differences, and their effect on the underlying loss landscape, is not well understood. In this paper, we explore the structure of neural loss functions, and the effect of loss landscapes on generalization, using a range of visualization methods. First, we introduce a simple "filter normalization" method that helps us visualize loss function curvature, and make meaningful side-by-side comparisons between loss functions. Then, using a variety of visualizations, we explore how network architecture affects the loss landscape, and how training parameters affect the shape of minimizers.


Visualizing the Loss Landscape of Neural Nets

Neural Information Processing Systems

Neural network training relies on our ability to find "good" minimizers of highly non-convex loss functions. It is well known that certain network architecture designs (e.g., skip connections) produce loss functions that train easier, and well-chosen training parameters (batch size, learning rate, optimizer) produce minimizers that generalize better. However, the reasons for these differences, and their effect on the underlying loss landscape, is not well understood. In this paper, we explore the structure of neural loss functions, and the effect of loss landscapes on generalization, using a range of visualization methods. First, we introduce a simple "filter normalization" method that helps us visualize loss function curvature, and make meaningful side-by-side comparisons between loss functions. Then, using a variety of visualizations, we explore how network architecture affects the loss landscape, and how training parameters affect the shape of minimizers.


Convergence Analysis of Two-layer Neural Networks with ReLU Activation

Neural Information Processing Systems

In recent years, stochastic gradient descent (SGD) based techniques has become the standard tools for training neural networks. However, formal theoretical understanding of why SGD can train neural networks in practice is largely missing. In this paper, we make progress on understanding this mystery by providing a convergence analysis for SGD on a rich subset of two-layer feedforward networks with ReLU activations. This subset is characterized by a special structure called "identity mapping". We prove that, if input follows from Gaussian distribution, with standard $O(1/\sqrt{d})$ initialization of the weights, SGD converges to the global minimum in polynomial number of steps. Unlike normal vanilla networks, the "identity mapping" makes our network asymmetric and thus the global minimum is unique. To complement our theory, we are also able to show experimentally that multi-layer networks with this mapping have better performance compared with normal vanilla networks. Our convergence theorem differs from traditional non-convex optimization techniques. We show that SGD converges to optimal in "two phases": In phase I, the gradient points to the wrong direction, however, a potential function $g$ gradually decreases. Then in phase II, SGD enters a nice one point convex region and converges. We also show that the identity mapping is necessary for convergence, as it moves the initial point to a better place for optimization. Experiment verifies our claims.


Stochastic Training of Neural Networks via Successive Convex Approximations

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper proposes a new family of algorithms for training neural networks (NNs). These are based on recent developments in the field of non-convex optimization, going under the general name of successive convex approximation (SCA) techniques. The basic idea is to iteratively replace the original (non-convex, highly dimensional) learning problem with a sequence of (strongly convex) approximations, which are both accurate and simple to optimize. Differently from similar ideas (e.g., quasi-Newton algorithms), the approximations can be constructed using only first-order information of the neural network function, in a stochastic fashion, while exploiting the overall structure of the learning problem for a faster convergence. We discuss several use cases, based on different choices for the loss function (e.g., squared loss and cross-entropy loss), and for the regularization of the NN's weights. We experiment on several medium-sized benchmark problems, and on a large-scale dataset involving simulated physical data. The results show how the algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art techniques, providing faster convergence to a better minimum. Additionally, we show how the algorithm can be easily parallelized over multiple computational units without hindering its performance. In particular, each computational unit can optimize a tailored surrogate function defined on a randomly assigned subset of the input variables, whose dimension can be selected depending entirely on the available computational power.


Optimization for deep learning: theory and algorithms

arXiv.org Machine Learning

When and why can a neural network be successfully trained? This article provides an overview of optimization algorithms and theory for training neural networks. First, we discuss the issue of gradient explosion/vanishing and the more general issue of undesirable spectrum, and then discuss practical solutions including careful initialization and normalization methods. Second, we review generic optimization methods used in training neural networks, such as SGD, adaptive gradient methods and distributed methods, and theoretical results for these algorithms. Third, we review existing research on the global issues of neural network training, including results on bad local minima, mode connectivity, lottery ticket hypothesis and infinite-width analysis.