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This is how the Hobbit director used machine learning to rewrite the story of the Beatles

#artificialintelligence

In January 1969, the Beatles had 21 days a new album, register documentary film And back to playing in front of the audience. Contracted to Twickenham Film Studios, the idea behind the project came in many ways from Paul McCartney – in what many believe was an attempt to save the group. It all ended with their last concert, their last studio album, and with a documentary that apparently documented the deep struggles within "The Fab Four". Since then, this has been seen as the time of the Beatles really Although the breach was not officially completed until the spring of the following year. Several contestants were uncomfortable with Yoko Ono's presence, and controversies led to George Harrison's "resignation" to the Beatles for three weeks, before returning somewhat reluctantly.


'It smells like gunpowder': Astronauts tell of their time on the moon (audio)

Christian Science Monitor | Science

What happens on the moon ... winds up in the NASA archives forever. From astronauts joking about losing the keys to the spaceship and calling each other "twinkle toes" to merrily singing as they float above the moon dust, footage from the Apollo-era moonwalks has immortalized the magic of those once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Monitor science reporter Eva Botkin-Kowacki had a chance to ask two of those national heroes directly about what that experience has meant to them. Charlie Duke was in mission control when Apollo 11 landed on July 20, 1969. He got the chance to go himself three years later. Harrison "Jack" Schmitt was one of the last two men to walk on the surface of the moon.


'It smells like gunpowder': Astronauts tell of their time on the moon

Christian Science Monitor | Science

What happens on the moon ... winds up in the NASA archives forever. From astronauts joking about losing the keys to the spaceship and calling each other "twinkle toes" to merrily singing as they float above the moon dust, footage from the Apollo-era moonwalks has immortalized the magic of those once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Monitor science reporter Eva Botkin-Kowacki had a chance to ask two of those national heroes directly about what that experience has meant to them. Charlie Duke was in mission control when Apollo 11 landed on July 20, 1969. He got the chance to go himself three years later. Harrison "Jack" Schmitt was one of the last two men to walk on the surface of the moon.


Watch Nixon's 'Apollo 11 Disaster' Deepfake Video

#artificialintelligence

A recent article outlines the growing danger of deepfakes and their increased realism, due to machine learning and artificial intelligence. MIT's Center for Advanced Virtuality has created a technologically advanced storytelling project that has manipulated archived footage of President Richard Nixon's 1969 speech during the Apollo 11 lunar landing. The goal of the video is to demonstrate the convincing deepfake technology and warn the public of the burgeoning threat of media misinformation. While the manipulation of photography has existed since the 19th century, becoming affluent during the era of motion pictures, the current state of deepfakes has become alarmingly realistic. Beginning in the late 90's, computer scientists began experimenting with facial reanimation.


'Apollo 11' is a stunning record of one of humanity's greatest achievements

Mashable

Half a century after the moon landing, the event has become, for most people, just another fact of history. It's something we only remember in the first place because it was so momentous, but it's so commonly known that any thrill associated with it has long since faded. In other words, sure, it's cool that humans have walked on the moon. But when's the last time you really stopped to realize that, Holy shit, we landed on the frickin' moon? Thank goodness, then, that we have films like Apollo 11 to reminds us of that original wonder.