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#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being used both to monitor and prevent crimes in many countries. AI is used in such areas as bomb detection and deactivation, surveillance, prediction, social media scanning and interviewing suspects. However, for all the hype and hoopla around AI, there is scope for growth of its role in crime management. Currently, a few issues are proving problematic. AI is not uniformly engaged across countries in crime management.


How AI Is Helping in the Fight Against Crime

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being used both to monitor and prevent crimes in many countries. AI is used in such areas as bomb detection and deactivation, surveillance, prediction, social media scanning and interviewing suspects. However, for all the hype and hoopla around AI, there is scope for growth of its role in crime management. Currently, a few issues are proving problematic. AI is not uniformly engaged across countries in crime management.


AI for Crime Prevention and Detection - 5 Current Applications

#artificialintelligence

Companies and cities all over world are experimenting with using artificial intelligence to reduce and prevent crime, and to more quickly respond to crimes in progress. The ideas behind many of these projects is that crimes are relatively predictable; it just requires being able to sort through a massive volume of data to find patterns that are useful to law enforcement. This kind of data analysis was technologically impossible a few decades ago, but the hope is that recent developments in machine learning are up to the task. There is good reason why companies and government are both interested in trying to use AI in this manner. As of 2010, the United States spent over $80 billion a year on incarations at the state, local, and federal levels. Estimates put the United States' total spending on law enforcement at over $100 billion a year.


Improving Law Enforcement Intelligence Gathering and Use with Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) and…

#artificialintelligence

As society has evolved, technology has as well, and there is a growing awareness that already-established police techniques -- if used exclusively -- are somewhat out-of-date and oftentimes quite expensive for what they offer. When departments sink valuable resources into maintaining old systems instead of investing into newer, more efficient, and cost-effective technologies -- especially in an era of budget cuts where law enforcement agencies are forced to make difficult decisions as to where to cut funding -- these agencies are missing out on a valuable source of information. One only needs to look at history to witness the evolution of criminal investigations. Fingerprinting, DNA analysis, and computer information systems such as CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) and NDIS (National DNA Index System) have improved investigatory efforts considerably; however, as technology continues to evolve -- and criminals are openly taking advantage of this new technology -- law enforcement agencies may be missing out on a valuable opportunity if they don't embrace more openly the tremendous benefits such new technology brings. The United States spends more than $100 billion annually on law enforcement and incarceration, and this figure does not even consider other economic impacts of crime in terms of victims' costs, property devaluation, and higher outlays for companies to ensure their security.


How Robots, IoT And Artificial Intelligence Are Transforming The Police

@machinelearnbot

Arrests have been made thanks to the evidence collected from connected digital devices such as the Amazon dot and a Fitbit. This is just the tip of the transformation that law enforcement will experience because of the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence and robots. There are certainly benefits to applying this new technology to help fight crime, but it also raises some challenging questions regarding our right to privacy and security breaches. Law enforcement agencies across the world are getting trained on what to look for at crime scenes and how to handle digital evidence. Gaming consoles, Echo devices and even Fitbits have provided valuable information to help solve crimes.