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Scientists force computer to binge on TV shows and predict what humans will do

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Researchers have taught a computer to do a better-than-expected job of predicting what characters on TV shows will do, just by forcing the machine to study 600 hours' worth of YouTube videos. The experiment could serve as a commentary on the state of research into artificial intelligence, or on the predictability of sitcom plots. It also calls to mind the scenes from countless science-fiction movies where the alien gets up to speed on human culture just by watching TV. MIT's Carl Vondrick and his colleagues are due to present the results of their experiment next week at the International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in Las Vegas. The researchers developed predictive-vision software that uses machine learning to anticipate what actions should follow a given set of video frames.


Artificial intelligence algorithm predicts the future

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Researchers have developed a deep learning algorithm capable of successfully predicting what will happen in a video clip based on one still clip from the footage. The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) made the breakthrough in predictive vision by training an algorithm using 600 hundred hours of YouTube videos. By searching for patterns and recognizable objects like hands and faces, the algorithm was able to predict human interactions such as hugging, kissing, shaking hands or high fiving. The research is set to be presented this week at the International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR). "Humans automatically learn to anticipate actions through experience, which is what made us interested in trying to imbue computers with the same sort of common sense," said MIT PhD student and the paper's first author Carl Vondrick.


MIT Creates AI Able to See Two Seconds Into the Future

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When we see two people meet, we can often predict what happens next: a handshake, a hug, or maybe even a kiss. Our ability to anticipate actions is thanks to intuitions born out of a lifetime of experiences. Machines, on the other hand, have trouble making use of complex knowledge like that. Computer systems that predict actions would open up new possibilities ranging from robots that can better navigate human environments, to emergency response systems that predict falls, to Google Glass-style headsets that feed you suggestions for what to do in different situations. This week researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have made an important new breakthrough in predictive vision, developing an algorithm that can anticipate interactions more accurately than ever before.


Teaching machines to predict the future

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When we see two people meet, we can often predict what happens next: A handshake, a hug, or maybe even a kiss. Our ability to anticipate actions is thanks to intuitions born out of a lifetime of experiences. Machines, on the other hand, have trouble making use of complex knowledge like that. Computer systems that predict actions would open up new possibilities ranging from robots that can better navigate human environments, to emergency response systems that predict falls, to Google Glass-style headsets that feed you suggestions for what to do in different situations. This week researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory(CSAIL) have made an important new breakthrough in predictive vision, developing an algorithm that can anticipate interactions more accurately than ever before.


Can computers predict the future?

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Most people have occasionally experienced an awkward hug/handshake combination where one person goes in for a hug while the other extends a hand to shake. Still, more often, humans are able to anticipate how to meet another person's greeting, thanks to years of experience with human interaction. But can a machine develop the same kind of intuition? Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) in Cambridge set out to train a computer to be able to predict how people will greet each other. And their algorithm can do just that.