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How an artificial intelligence learnt to play

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Go looks simple, deceptively so. The Chinese board game is played on a board with a grid of 19x19 lines. The object is for two players to alternately place black and white markers on vacant intersections of those lines. And now, this nearly 3,000-year-old board game is a frontier of Artificial Intelligence development. At the time of writing, Google's DeepMind AI's AlphaGo program has played four games of a five game series against Go world champion, South Korea's Lee se-Dol.


Okay, now Google's Artificial Intelligence Division is just showing off

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In Seoul, South Korea, a Google-created artificial intelligence has been squaring off against a mortal man in the 2,500-year-old strategy game, called Go, that's several orders of magnitude more complicated than chess. When it was finally over, Google's AlphaGo won four out of five matchups, making AlphaGo a role model for young artificial intelligences everywhere. Wired reported that "AlphaGo relies on deep neural networks--networks of hardware and software that mimic the web of neurons in the human brain. With these neural nets, it can learn tasks by analyzing massive amounts of digital data." That's bad news for SEOs the world over, because Google isn't just using neural nets to beat Koreans at board games, it's also using these advanced networks to make their search results more efficient.


How artificial intelligence is redefining the future of real estate

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It was an experiment straight out of "2001: A Space Odyssey." In an effort to gauge the accuracy of AI technology, researchers presented real estate journalist John Rebchook with several recommended listings. The recommendations, which were based on a home Rebchook liked, came in two sets – one from Denver-area brokers, another from "Find More Genius," a computer algorithm that Denver-area broker Creed Smith had created. In the end, the humans did not stand a chance. Over three separate days of testing, Rebchook's favorite recommendation came from the algorithm each day, as did two of his three overall favorites.


The New Intel: How Nvidia Went From Powering Video Games To Revolutionizing Artificial Intelligence

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Nvidia cofounder Chris Malachowsky is eating a sausage omelet and sipping burnt coffee in a Denny's off the Berryessa overpass in San Jose. It was in this same dingy diner in April 1993 that three young electrical engineers--Malachowsky, Curtis Priem and Nvidia's current CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang--started a company devoted to making specialized chips that would generate faster and more realistic graphics for video games. East San Jose was a rough part of town back then--the front of the restaurant was pocked with bullet holes from people shooting at parked cop cars--and no one could have guessed that the three men drinking endless cups of coffee were laying the foundation for a company that would define computing in the early 21st century in the same way that Intel did in the 1990s. "There was no market in 1993, but we saw a wave coming," Malachowsky says. "There's a California surfing competition that happens in a five-month window every year. When they see some type of wave phenomenon or storm in Japan, they tell all the surfers to show up in California, because there's going to be a wave in two days.


The New Intel: How Nvidia Went From Powering Video Games To Revolutionizing Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Nvidia cofounder Chris Malachowsky is eating a sausage omelet and sipping burnt coffee in a Denny's off the Berryessa overpass in San Jose. It was in this same dingy diner in April 1993 that three young electrical engineers--Malachowsky, Curtis Priem and Nvidia's current CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang--started a company devoted to making specialized chips that would generate faster and more realistic graphics for video games. East San Jose was a rough part of town back then--the front of the restaurant was pocked with bullet holes from people shooting at parked cop cars--and no one could have guessed that the three men drinking endless cups of coffee were laying the foundation for a company that would define computing in the early 21st century in the same way that Intel did in the 1990s. "There was no market in 1993, but we saw a wave coming," Malachowsky says. "There's a California surfing competition that happens in a five-month window every year. When they see some type of wave phenomenon or storm in Japan, they tell all the surfers to show up in California, because there's going to be a wave in two days.