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Neural network accelerates plasma simulations

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By combining a deep understanding of plasma physics with machine learning techniques, DIFFER researchers developed a new ultrafast neural network model of the turbulent plasma in a fusion reactor. The neural network can accurately predict heat and particle transport in the fusion reactor up to 100.000 times faster than before: a vital tool to optimize the performance of future fusion power plants. Fusion reactors are fuelled by a plasma: a hot, ionized gas of hydrogen isotopes that fuse together at extreme temperatures to form helium and release clean energy. The behavior of the plasma is not easy to predict: the charged plasma particles respond not only to the magnetic field that keeps them trapped inside the reactor, but also to the electromagnetic fields they create themselves through their own motion. That makes predicting a fusion plasma in order to optimize its state a difficult but rewarding problem to tackle.


The 'star in a jar' that could provide limitless energy on Earth

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It would provide humankind with near limitless energy, ending dependence on fossil fuels for generating electricity. US Government physicists have backed plans to create'a star in a jar' - replicating on Earth the way the sun and stars create energy through fusion. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) revealed their plan for a next generation fusion device in a paper published in the journal Nuclear Fusion. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory revealed their plan for a next generation fusion device in a paper published in the journal Nuclear Fusion. Pictured, researchers inside the centre stack of the 94-million upgrade of the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade, which began operating last year.


Artificial intelligence helps prevent disruptions in fusion devices

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Fusion devices called tokamaks run increased risk of disruptions as researchers, aiming to maximize fusion power to create on Earth the fusion that powers the sun and stars, bump up against the operational limits of the facilities. Scientists thus must be able to boost fusion power without hitting those limits. This capability will be crucial for ITER, the large international tokamak under construction in France to demonstrate the practicality of fusion energy. Fusion reactions combine light elements in the form of plasma -- the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei that makes up 99 percent of the visible universe -- to generate massive amounts of energy. Scientists around the world are seeking to create fusion for a virtually inexhaustible supply of safe and clean power to generate electricity.


Artificial intelligence accelerates efforts to develop clean, virtually limitless fusion energy

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Artificial intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that is transforming scientific inquiry and industry, could now speed the development of safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy for generating electricity. A major step in this direction is under way at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University, where a team of scientists working with a Harvard graduate student is for the first time applying deep learning -- a powerful new version of the machine learning form of AI -- to forecast sudden disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house the reactions. "This research opens a promising new chapter in the effort to bring unlimited energy to Earth," Steve Cowley, director of PPPL, said of the findings, which are reported in the current issue of Nature magazine. "Artificial intelligence is exploding across the sciences and now it's beginning to contribute to the worldwide quest for fusion power." Fusion, which drives the sun and stars, is the fusing of light elements in the form of plasma -- the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei -- that generates energy.


Artificial Intelligence Accelerates Development of Limitless Fusion Energy

#artificialintelligence

Depiction of fusion research on a doughnut-shaped tokamak enhanced by artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that is transforming scientific inquiry and industry, could now speed the development of safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy for generating electricity. A major step in this direction is under way at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University, where a team of scientists working with a Harvard graduate student is for the first time applying deep learning -- a powerful new version of the machine learning form of AI -- to forecast sudden disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house the reactions. "This research opens a promising new chapter in the effort to bring unlimited energy to Earth," Steve Cowley, director of PPPL, said of the findings (link is external), which are reported in the current issue of Nature magazine. "Artificial intelligence is exploding across the sciences and now it's beginning to contribute to the worldwide quest for fusion power."