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BigData in HealthCare TLV April 16, 2019, Wohl Center, Tel Aviv

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"I am delighted to invite you to participate in the first Big DataTLV event in Israel to focus on HealthCare.The event takes place on April 16, 2019, in the Wohl Convention Center in the heart of Innovation Nation, Israel."


AI achieves near-human accuracy in diagnosing cancer

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New research suggests that computer models could help doctors achieve greater accuracy in the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. A research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system which is able to train computers to analyse pathologic image data [PDF]. The scientists hope that the programme could one day aid in diagnosing disease. 'Our AI method is based on deep learning, a machine-learning algorithm used for a range of applications including speech recognition and image recognition,' explained Andrew Beck, director of bioinformatics at the Cancer Research Institute at BIDMC and associate professor at HMS. He added: 'This approach teaches machines to interpret the complex patterns and structure observed in real-life data by building multi-layer artificial neural networks, in a process which is thought to show similarities with the learning process that occurs in layers of neurons in the brain's neocortex, the region where thinking occurs.'


Better Together

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Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. A research team from Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and recently developed artificial intelligence (AI) methods aimed at training computers to interpret pathology images, with the long-term goal of building AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate. "Our AI method is based on deep learning, a machine-learning algorithm used for a range of applications including speech recognition and image recognition," explained pathologist Andrew Beck, HMS associate professor of pathology and director of bioinformatics at the Cancer Research Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess. "This approach teaches machines to interpret the complex patterns and structure observed in real-life data by building multi-layer artificial neural networks, in a process which is thought to show similarities with the learning process that occurs in layers of neurons in the brain's neocortex, the region where thinking occurs."


Automated Artificial Intelligence Speeds Identification of Blood Pathogens GEN

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Scientists in Boston have developed an automated artificial intelligence (AI)-guided microscopy system that can help diagnose serious bloodstream infections (BSIs) quickly and accurately. The technology, which uses a trained convolutional neural network (CNN) to recognize the different shapes and distribution of pathogenic bacteria, could help to speed diagnosis and potentially save patient lives, as well as address the current lack of trained microbiology technologists, suggest its developers at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).


Harvard: Israel's MedAware could save US health system millions per year

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Technology developed by Israel's MedAware could potentially save the United States health system $800 million annually by preventing medication errors, based on a study published earlier this week in the Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.MedAware developed an AI-based patient safety solution. The new study that was conducted by two Harvard doctors validates both the significant clinical impact and anticipated ROI of MedAware's machine learning-enabled clinical decision support platform designed to prevent medication-related errors and risks.MedAware uses AI methods similar to those used in the finance sector to stop fraud, by identifying "outliers" from a trend or practice in order to recognize suspicious or erroneous transactions. Most other electronic health record alert systems are rule based.In the US alone, prescription drug errors result in "substantial morbidity, mortality and excess health care costs estimated at more than $20 billion annually in the United States," according to Dr. Ronen Rozenblum, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and director of business development for patient safety research and practice at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Rozenblum was the study's lead author, along with Harvard professor Dr. David Bates. Rozenblum, an Israeli who has been living in Boston for more than a decade, has been testing MedAware for the past five years.