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Artificial intelligence panel urges US to boost tech skills amid China's rise

Boston Herald

An artificial intelligence commission led by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is urging the U.S. to boost its AI skills to counter China, including by pursuing "AI-enabled" weapons -- something that Google itself has shied away from on ethical grounds. Schmidt and current executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle and Amazon are among the 15 members of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, which released its final report to Congress on Monday. "To win in AI we need more money, more talent, stronger leadership," Schmidt said Monday. The report says that machines that can "perceive, decide, and act more quickly" than humans and with more accuracy are going to be deployed for military purposes -- with or without the involvement of the U.S. and other democracies. It warns against unchecked use of autonomous weapons but expresses opposition to a global ban. It also calls for "wise restraints" on the use of AI tools such as facial recognition that can be used for mass surveillance.


Report: The Government and Tech Need to Cooperate on AI

#artificialintelligence

America's national security depends on the government getting access to the artificial intelligence breakthroughs made by the technology industry. So says a report submitted to Congress on Monday by the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence. The group, which includes executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle, and Amazon, says the Pentagon and intelligence agencies need a better relationship with Silicon Valley to stay ahead of China. "AI adoption for national security is imperative," said Eric Schmidt, chair of the commission and formerly CEO of Google, at a news briefing Monday. "The private sector and government officials need to build a shared sense of responsibility."


Report: The Government and Tech Need to Cooperate on AI

#artificialintelligence

America's national security depends on the government getting access to the artificial intelligence breakthroughs made by the technology industry. So says a report submitted to Congress Monday by the National Security Commission on AI. The group, which includes executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle, and Amazon, says the Pentagon and intelligence agencies need a better relationship with Silicon Valley to stay ahead of China. "AI adoption for national security is imperative," said Eric Schmidt, chair of the commission, and formerly CEO of Google, at a news briefing Monday. "The private sector and government officials need to build a shared sense of responsibility."


National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence issues report on how to maintain U.S. dominance

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The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence today released its report today with dozens of recommendations for President Joe Biden, Congress, and business and government leaders. China, the group said, represents the first challenge to U.S. technological dominance that threatens economic and military power for the first time since the end of World War II. The commissioners call for a $40 billion investment to expand and democratize AI research and development a "modest down payment for future breakthroughs", and encourage an attitude toward investment in innovation from policymakers akin that which led to building the interstate highway system in the 1950s. The report recommends several changes that could shape business, tech, and national security. For example, amid a global shortage of semiconductors, the report calls for the United States to stay "two generations ahead" of China in semiconductor manufacturing and suggests a hefty tax credit for semiconductor manufacturers.


The U.S. military, algorithmic warfare, and big tech

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We learned this week that the Department of Defense is using facial recognition at scale, and Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said he believes China is selling lethal autonomous drones. Amid all that, you may have missed Joint AI Center (JAIC) director Lieutenant General Jack Shanahan -- who is charged by the Pentagon with modernizing and guiding artificial intelligence directives -- talking about a future of algorithmic warfare. Algorithmic warfare, which could dramatically change warfare as we know it, is built on the assumption that combat actions will happen faster than humans' ability to make decisions. Shanahan says algorithmic warfare would thus require some reliance on AI systems, though he stresses a need to implement rigorous testing and evaluation before using AI in the field to ensure it doesn't "take on a life of its own, so to speak." "We are going to be shocked by the speed, the chaos, the bloodiness, and the friction of a future fight in which this will be playing out, maybe in microseconds at times. How do we envision that fight happening? It has to be algorithm against algorithm," Shanahan said during a conversation with former Google CEO Eric Schmidt and Google VP of global affairs Kent Walker.