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facebook-at-work-slack-competitor-launch

Engadget

With nearly two years of development and 450 companies already on board, Facebook at Work is gearing up for a commercial launch of its in-house social network and communications platform for companies. According to a report from The Information, the service will launch next month and the social network will charge a set monthly fee per active user. Although Facebook hasn't disclosed how much that will cost exactly, several people briefed on the launch say companies of any size will be able to sign up for Facebook at Work through the social network's main site. One interesting -- and potentially dystopian -- twist the company has reportedly been pitching alongside the Facebook at Work product is the potential to use artificial intelligence to determine employee sentiment.


Farnham

AAAI Conferences

Web search engines emerged prior to the dominance of social media. What if we imagined search as integrating with social media from the ground up? So.cl is a web application that combines web browsing, search, and social networking for the purposes of sharing and learning around topics of interest. In this paper, we present the results of a deployment study examining existing learning practices around search and social networking for students, and how these practices shifted when participants adopted So.cl. We found prior to using So.cl that students already heavily employed search tools and social media for learning. With the use of So.cl, we found that users engaged in lightweight, fun social sharing and learning for informal, personal topics, but not for more heavyweight collaboration around school or work. The public nature of So.cl encouraged users to post search results as much for self-expression as for searching, enabling serendipitous discovery around interests.




The Information Ecology of Social Media and Online Communities

AI Magazine

Social media systems such as weblogs, photo- and link-sharing sites, Wikis and on-line forums are currently thought to produce up to one third of new Web content. One thing that sets these Web 2.0'' sites apart from traditional Web pages and resources is that they are intertwined with other forms of networked data. Their standard hyperlinks are enriched by social networks, comments, trackbacks, advertisements, tags, RDF data and metadata. We describe recent work on building systems that use models of the Blogosphere to recognize spam blogs, find opinions on topics, identify communities of interest, derive trust relationships, and detect influential bloggers.