Rotary and linear molecular motors driven by pulses of a chemical fuel

Science

Many biomolecular motors catalyze the hydrolysis of chemical fuels, such as adenosine triphosphate, and use the energy released to direct motion through information ratchet mechanisms. Here we describe chemically-driven artificial rotary and linear molecular motors that operate through a fundamentally different type of mechanism. The directional rotation of [2]- and [3]catenane rotary molecular motors and the transport of substrates away from equilibrium by a linear molecular pump are induced by acid-base oscillations. The changes simultaneously switch the binding site affinities and the labilities of barriers on the track, creating an energy ratchet. The linear and rotary molecular motors are driven by aliquots of a chemical fuel, trichloroacetic acid.


Safety Council: Motor Vehicle Deaths Dip Slightly in 2017

U.S. News

There were 18,689 motor vehicle deaths through June 30, said the council, a leading safety organization that gets its data from state governments. But deaths were still up 8 percent compared to the first six months of 2015.


Safety Council: Motor Vehicle Deaths Dip Slightly in 2017

U.S. News

FILE - In this April 14, 2017, file photo, law enforcement investigate a quadruple fatal car accident on Riverside Road in St. Joseph, Mo. New data show U.S. motor vehicle deaths and injuries were down slightly in the first six months of 2017, although they were still significantly higher than they were two years ago. The preliminary figures were compiled by the National Safety Council, which gets its data from state governments.


Source: Toyota, Mazda Plan EV Partnership, Possible US Plant

U.S. News

FILE - In this May 13, 2015 file photo, Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda, left, and Mazda Motor Corp. President Masamichi Kogai pose for photographers prior to a press conference in Tokyo. Japanese automakers Toyota Motor Corp. and Mazda Motor Corp. are partnering in electric vehicles with a deal expected to be announced later Friday, Aug. 4, 2017.


Motor neurone man trials new voice

BBC News

A man with motor neurone disease (MND) is trialling a voice synthesiser with a Yorkshire accent. Mr Liversidge's speech is starting to slur, but scientists aim to "repair" the flaws in it with the aid of'voice donors'. About 30 Yorkshiremen are needed to program a voice for Mr Liversidge, which he will control using eye movements.