Goto

Collaborating Authors

Google, social media win big

FOX News

The third and final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in Las Vegas, Nev. on Wednesday night had people flocking to search engines and social media to share their favorite moments, research terms and organizations, and fact check the candidates on everything from Iraq to the Clinton Foundation. Trump came out swinging, pointing a finger at Democrats for causing violence at his rallies and saying: "Just like if you look at what came out today on the clips, where I was wondering, what happened with my rally in Chicago and other rallies where we had such violence? She's the one, and Obama, that caused the violence." That was a reference to recordings by activist James O'Keefe, president of the Project Veritas organization, who took to Twitter to point out the connection. The discussion between the two candidates also touched on WikiLeaks and Russian hacking, and Clinton also asked viewers to turn to Google regarding Trump's views on Iraq.


L.A. police, county sheriff's department on first-ever federal list of agencies not honoring ICE detainers

Los Angeles Times

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday released the first ever report on law enforcement agencies that are potentially "endangering Americans" by failing to cooperate with ICE detainers and named multiple jurisdictions in California. As part of a Trump administration directive to "highlight" uncooperative police agencies, the weekly "Declined Detainer Outcome Report," lists those that have failed to honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement requests to further detain suspects so they can be processed for possible deportation. "When law enforcement agencies fail to honor immigration detainers and release serious criminal offenders, it undermines ICE's ability to protect the public safety and carry out its mission," said Acting ICE Director Thomas Homan. Monday's detainer report listed 10 jurisdictions that fail to comply with detainers "on a routine basis." They are: Clark County, Nevada; Nassau County, New York; Cook County, Illinois; Montgomery County, Iowa; Snohomish County, Washington; Franklin County, New York; Washington County, Oregon; Alachua County, Florida; Franklin County, Iowa; and Franklin County, Pennsylvania.


Essential California: A family returns to Mexico with U.S.-born children in tow

Los Angeles Times

Faced with diminishing job prospects and a president who promised to make life harder for them, 6-year-old Luz Madrigal's mother and father -- immigrants in the country illegally -- decided to go back to Mexico. They joined more than a hundred people voluntarily returning since January to Mexico with the help of consulates in Los Angeles, Houston and Chicago. Thousands of others across the country have also gone to Latin American consulates seeking dual citizenship for their U.S.-born children after President Trump's inauguration. Plus: For parents who brought their children into the country illegally and have decided to stay, there's always the worry, the guilt and the fear of not knowing if today is their last day in the United States. Police said a Whittier businessman named Richard Wall is a suspect in three execution-style slayings in L.A. and Las Vegas.


MWC 2019: AT&T says customers love 5GE

ZDNet

AT&T is standing by its 5GE branding, saying that it is right to communicate to customers when they are in a faster zone. Speaking during Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019 in Barcelona, AT&T Business CEO Thaddeus Arroyo told ZDNet that 5GE is distinct from the carrier's 5G service. "I think if you look at 5GE, and this is the evolution platform that we've created and then that will become the foundation upon which we build 5G, these are two separate platforms," Arroyo said. "So what's important for us is when a customer is in a 5GE environment, which ultimately provides them access to faster speeds when they have the right device. When they have the right network, we want them to know they're in an environment that's going to perform better. AT&T's 5GE messaging lets customers know when their compatible device is in a 5G Evolution area, providing speeds and coverage that all other carriers are calling LTE Advanced. The 5GE branding caused an uproar among its rival carriers, with Sprint even filing a lawsuit earlier this month claiming that it is false and misleading, and is causing Sprint to lose revenue. Read also: Did AT&T trick your business into paying for fake 5G? Sprint lawsuit says yes (TechRepublic) T-Mobile -- which plans to merge with Sprint this year -- likewise mocked AT&T's 5GE branding last month, while Verizon CTO Kyle Malady criticised the move. AT&T announced its 5G network going live in mid-December in parts of Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Waco, Atlanta, Charlotte, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Louisville, Oklahoma City, New Orleans, and Raleigh. In the first half of 2019, it will also be switched on across Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, Las Vegas, Orlando, and Nashville, as well as in Chicago and Minneapolis. Arroyo said AT&T is working with Samsung, Nokia, and Ericsson on providing the tech behind its 5G deployments. CTO Andre Fuetsch this week told ZDNet that AT&T will be bringing Samsung's 5G smartphones onto the network later this year, as well as its existing home broadband Nighthawk router. The chief technology officer also spoke on how the 5G Massive MIMO antennas could actually open up new enterprise and Internet of Things (IoT) opportunities thanks to more precise location data. "What's really unique about that technology that we'll be deploying is it has characteristics such as beamforming, which allows us ... [to] send a stream directly to your device," Fuetsch said. "It actually allows you to know exactly where that device is, and so now you've just kind of opened up this whole new world of very precise location, and that's something we've never been able to do before.


U.S. Inc. cheers ruling striking down Obama overtime rules but many firms had already upped pay

The Japan Times

LAS VEGAS – Businesses around the country on Wednesday cheered a court decision blocking the Obama administration's sweeping new overtime rules, but many had already raised salaries or ordered managers to stick to a strict 40-hour workweek to avoid costs they expected to incur starting next week. An injunction issued Tuesday by the federal court in the Eastern District of Texas prevents the Department of Labor from mandating overtime pay for salaried employees who make less than about $47,500 a year -- a dramatic jump from the old threshold of $23,660. More than 4 million workers would have been newly eligible for time-and-a-half pay under the rule, which now faces far more uncertainty from Donald Trump's incoming administration. The ruling giving businesses a reprieve "is a little late for a lot of people's taste," said Tom Gimbel of Chicago-based LaSalle Network, a staffing firm that advised companies on how to prepare for the new rule. "A lot of companies had already rolled it out."