Honed over four decades, Osaka police use facial recognition skills to arrest dozens of wanted criminals every year

The Japan Times

OSAKA – Despite advances in facial recognition technology, the police in Osaka still rely on pure skill to find fugitives, with investigators using only their memory to arrest dozens of wanted criminals every year. While other police forces in the world have "super recognizer" units that hunt down fugitives, the so-called miatari (look and hit) technique used in Osaka has contributed to the arrests of over 4,000 criminals in Japan since the Osaka Prefectural Police introduced it as a formal investigative method in November 1978. There has not been a single wrongful arrest. "The best part of this method is being able to detect fugitives who are hard to find in normal investigations," said a senior investigator in Osaka. He says a forensic analysis is an imperative part of criminal investigations, but "we want to pass on the tradition because our job is to make sure no one gets away with a crime."


How AI is helping industries with facial Identification/Recognition

#artificialintelligence

Face recognition or identification is the forward-thinking technology due to artificial intelligence. AI is utilized to create a smart engine which is based on the processing of visual content and visual data software. It is built to forecast the benefit to the businesses and its customer. The advancement of facial identification technology embedded with AI is to create a smart system that is able to scan faces on the behalf of Face ID automatically. From starting AI has created buzzword all over the world with the ability to perform cognitive functions expected from humans.


Manchester City warned against using facial recognition on fans

The Guardian

Manchester City have been cautioned against the introduction of facial recognition technology, which a civil rights group says would risk "normalising a mass surveillance tool". The reigning Premier League champions are considering introducing technology allowing fans to get into the Etihad Stadium more quickly by showing their faces instead of tickets, according to the Sunday Times. If someone is recognised as having bought a ticket, they would be ushered in by a green light, and if not they would be halted with a yellow one. Hannah Couchman, the policy and campaigns officer at Liberty, said: "This is a disturbing move by Manchester City, subjecting football fans to an intrusive scan, much like taking a fingerprint, just so they can go to the Saturday game. "It's alarming that fans will be sharing deeply sensitive personal information with a private company that boasts about collecting and sharing data on each person that walks through the gate, and using this to deny people entry.


Who Owns Your Face?

The Atlantic - Technology

Data brokers already buy and sell detailed profiles that describe who you are. They track your public records and your online behavior to figure out your age, your gender, your relationship status, your exact location, how much money you make, which supermarket you shop at, and on and on and on. It's entirely reasonable to wonder how companies are collecting and using images of you, too. Facebook already uses facial recognition software to tag individual people in photos. Apple's new app, Clips, recognizes individuals in the videos you take.


Microsoft says its facial recognition technology is less biased

Mashable

Microsoft claims its facial recognition technology just got a little less awful. Earlier this year, a study by MIT researchers found that tools from IBM, Microsoft, and Chinese company Megvii could correctly identify light-skinned men with 99-percent accuracy. But it incorrectly identified darker-skinned women as often as one-third of the time. Now imagine a computer incorrectly flagging an image at an airport or in a police database, and you can see how dangerous those errors could be. Microsoft's software performed poorly in the study.