Linear Discriminant Analysis

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Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is most commonly used as dimensionality reduction technique in the pre-processing step for pattern-classification and machine learning applications. The goal is to project a dataset onto a lower-dimensional space with good class-separability in order avoid overfitting ("curse of dimensionality") and also reduce computational costs. Ronald A. Fisher formulated the Linear Discriminant in 1936 (The Use of Multiple Measurements in Taxonomic Problems), and it also has some practical uses as classifier. The original Linear discriminant was described for a 2-class problem, and it was then later generalized as "multi-class Linear Discriminant Analysis" or "Multiple Discriminant Analysis" by C. R. Rao in 1948 (The utilization of multiple measurements in problems of biological classification) The general LDA approach is very similar to a Principal Component Analysis (for more information about the PCA, see the previous article Implementing a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in Python step by step), but in addition to finding the component axes that maximize the variance of our data (PCA), we are additionally interested in the axes that maximize the separation between multiple classes (LDA). So, in a nutshell, often the goal of an LDA is to project a feature space (a dataset n-dimensional samples) onto a smaller subspace (where) while maintaining the class-discriminatory information.


Principal Component Analysis

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Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a simple yet popular and useful linear transformation technique that is used in numerous applications, such as stock market predictions, the analysis of gene expression data, and many more. In this tutorial, we will see that PCA is not just a "black box", and we are going to unravel its internals in 3 basic steps. The sheer size of data in the modern age is not only a challenge for computer hardware but also a main bottleneck for the performance of many machine learning algorithms. The main goal of a PCA analysis is to identify patterns in data; PCA aims to detect the correlation between variables. If a strong correlation between variables exists, the attempt to reduce the dimensionality only makes sense.


Dimension Reduction Techniques with Python

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Why Do We Need to Reduce the Dimensionality? A high-dimensional dataset is a dataset that has a great number of columns (or variables). Such a dataset presents many mathematical or computational challenges. The good news is that variables (or called features) are often correlated. We can find a subset of the variables to represent the same level of information in the data, or transform the variables to a new set of variables without losing much information.


Kernel tricks and nonlinear dimensionality reduction via RBF kernel PCA

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Most machine learning algorithms have been developed and statistically validated for linearly separable data. Popular examples are linear classifiers like Support Vector Machines (SVMs) or the (standard) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for dimensionality reduction. However, most real world data requires nonlinear methods in order to perform tasks that involve the analysis and discovery of patterns successfully. The focus of this article is to briefly introduce the idea of kernel methods and to implement a Gaussian radius basis function (RBF) kernel that is used to perform nonlinear dimensionality reduction via BF kernel principal component analysis (kPCA). The main purpose of principal component analysis (PCA) is the analysis of data to identify patterns that represent the data "well."


Glossary of Machine Learning Terms

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ROC curves are widely used because they are relatively simple to understand and capture more than one aspect of the classification.