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Flip-flop qubits: UNSW conceives 'radical' quantum computing design

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the invention of a "radical" architecture for quantum computing, essentially allowing quantum bits (qubits) -- the basic unit of information in a quantum computer -- to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled. The invention is based on novel "flip-flop qubits" that UNSW said promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper and easier. To operate the flip-flop qubit, researchers need to pull the electron away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top; doing so creates an electric dipole. The conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit using both the nucleus and the electron. The new chip design allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches.


Chance discovery brings quantum computing using standard microchips a step closer

#artificialintelligence

A study to prod an antimony nucleus (buried in the middle of this device) with magnetic fields became one with electric fields when a key wire melted a gap in it. An accidental innovation has given a dark-horse approach to quantum computing a boost. For decades, scientists have dreamed of using atomic nuclei embedded in silicon--the familiar stuff of microchips--as quantum bits, or qubits, in a superpowerful quantum computer, manipulating them with magnetic fields. Now, researchers in Australia have stumbled across a way to control such a nucleus with more-manageable electric fields, raising the prospect of controlling the qubits in much the same way as transistors in an ordinary microchip. "That's incredibly important," says Thaddeus Ladd, a research physicist at HRL Laboratories LLC., a private research company.


Quantum Computing Breakthrough: Silicon Qubits Interact at Long-Distance

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at Princeton University have made an important step forward in the quest to build a quantum computer using silicon components, which are prized for their low cost and versatility compared to the hardware in today's quantum computers. The team showed that a silicon-spin quantum bit (shown in the box) can communicate with another quantum bit located a significant distance away on a computer chip. The feat could enable connections between multiple quantum bits to perform complex calculations. Princeton scientists demonstrate that two silicon quantum bits can communicate across relatively long distances in a turning point for the technology. Imagine a world where people could only talk to their next-door neighbor, and messages must be passed house to house to reach far destinations.


Australian experts find new way to build quantum computer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers in Australia have found a new way to build quantum computers using a'flip flop' chip design. Quantum computers promise to harness the strange ability of subatomic particles to exist in more than one state at a time. This could allow them to solve problems that are too complex or time-consuming for existing computers. It could also pave the way for machines that are completely impenetrable to hackers using conventional methods of attack. Researchers in Australia have found a new way to build quantum computers which they say would make them dramatically easier and cheaper to produce at scale.


UNSW obtains 10-fold boost in quantum computing stability

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have created a new quantum bit (qubit) which remains in a stable superposition for 10 times longer than previously achieved, expanding the time during which calculations could be performed in a future silicon quantum computer. According to Arne Laucht, a Research Fellow at the School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications at UNSW, the new qubit, made up of the spin of a single atom in silicon and merged with an electromagnetic field -- known as a dressed qubit -- retains quantum information for much longer that an "undressed" atom, which opens up new avenues quantum computer creation. The Australian-based team said the race to building a quantum computer has been called the "space race of the 21st century" as it is both a difficult and ambitious challenge to undertake. The appeal, however, is the potential to deliver revolutionary tools for tackling otherwise impossible calculations, such as the design of complex drugs and advanced materials, or the rapid search of large-scale, unsorted databases. Explaining the importance of the breakthrough, Andrea Morello, leader of the research team and a Program Manager in the Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology (CQC2T) at UNSW, said its speed and power lies in the fact that quantum systems can host multiple "superpositions" of different initial states, treated as inputs in a computer that all get processed at the same time.