Flip-flop qubits: UNSW conceives 'radical' quantum computing design

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the invention of a "radical" architecture for quantum computing, essentially allowing quantum bits (qubits) -- the basic unit of information in a quantum computer -- to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled. The invention is based on novel "flip-flop qubits" that UNSW said promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper and easier. To operate the flip-flop qubit, researchers need to pull the electron away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top; doing so creates an electric dipole. The conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit using both the nucleus and the electron. The new chip design allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches.


Australian experts find new way to build quantum computer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers in Australia have found a new way to build quantum computers using a'flip flop' chip design. Quantum computers promise to harness the strange ability of subatomic particles to exist in more than one state at a time. This could allow them to solve problems that are too complex or time-consuming for existing computers. It could also pave the way for machines that are completely impenetrable to hackers using conventional methods of attack. Researchers in Australia have found a new way to build quantum computers which they say would make them dramatically easier and cheaper to produce at scale.


UNSW obtains 10-fold boost in quantum computing stability

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have created a new quantum bit (qubit) which remains in a stable superposition for 10 times longer than previously achieved, expanding the time during which calculations could be performed in a future silicon quantum computer. According to Arne Laucht, a Research Fellow at the School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications at UNSW, the new qubit, made up of the spin of a single atom in silicon and merged with an electromagnetic field -- known as a dressed qubit -- retains quantum information for much longer that an "undressed" atom, which opens up new avenues quantum computer creation. The Australian-based team said the race to building a quantum computer has been called the "space race of the 21st century" as it is both a difficult and ambitious challenge to undertake. The appeal, however, is the potential to deliver revolutionary tools for tackling otherwise impossible calculations, such as the design of complex drugs and advanced materials, or the rapid search of large-scale, unsorted databases. Explaining the importance of the breakthrough, Andrea Morello, leader of the research team and a Program Manager in the Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology (CQC2T) at UNSW, said its speed and power lies in the fact that quantum systems can host multiple "superpositions" of different initial states, treated as inputs in a computer that all get processed at the same time.


7 Core Qubit Technologies for Quantum Computing - Amit Ray

#artificialintelligence

Here we discussed the advantages and limitations of seven key qubit technologies for designing efficient quantum computing systems. The seven qubit types are: Superconducting qubits, Quantum dots qubits, Trapped Ion Qubits, Photonic qubits, Defect-based qubits, Topological Qubits, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) . They are the seven pathways for designing effective quantum computing systems. Each one of them have their own limitations and advantages. We have also discussed the hierarchies of qubit types.


One step closer to quantum computers: 'Dressed' qubit can retain data 10 TIMES longer than before

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Building a quantum computer has been called the'space race of the 21st century' โ€“ a difficult and ambitious challenge, with the potential to deliver revolutionary tools. Now an invention by engineers in Australia may have brought us one step closer to achieving the goal. The team designed a new kind of quantum bit, which can retain information for 10 times longer than ever previously achieved. The new quantum bit, known as a'dressed qubit' has been designed by researchers at the University of New South Wales, and is made up of the spin of a single atom in silicon, merged with an electromagnetic field (artist's impression) Quantum computing takes advantage of the ability of subatomic particles to exist in more than one state at any time. In traditional computers, data is expressed in one of two states โ€“ known as binary bits โ€“ which are either a 1 or a 0. But quantum computers use quantum bits, or qubits.