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Grindr aims to stamp out discrimination on its platform with 'Kindr' initiative

Mashable

Grindr has long had a problem with discrimination. It's evidenced by profiles which are openly racist, with terms like "Black block," "no gaysians" or "no chocolate or rice" that are written in these bios. Now the gay dating app is looking to stamp it out. It's launched an initiative called Kindr, updating its community guidelines in a stand against racism, bullying, or other forms of toxic behaviour. The biggest change to the guidelines is the banning of discriminatory language in these profile bios, and those who breach the new rules are subject to review by moderators.


Grindr dating app removes ethnicity filter to support Black Lives Matter

The Guardian

Grindr is removing an "ethnicity filter" from its dating app as part of its support for the Black Lives Matter movement, the company announced on Monday. The controversial feature, limited to those who stump up £12.99 a month for the premium version of the app, allows users to sort search results based on reported ethnicity, height, weight and other characteristics. In a statement posted to Instagram, the company said "We stand in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the hundreds of thousands of queer people of color who log in to our app every day. "We will continue to fight racism on Grindr, both through dialogue with our community and a zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform. As part of this commitment, and based on your feedback, we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.


10 years of Grindr: A rocky relationship

BBC News

It was 10 years ago, on the bus on my way to work, that I first I saw a man using Grindr. I had heard friends describe a free iPhone app that could show you where the nearest gay guy was. And sat in front of me was an early adopter, tapping his way through a grid of topless torsos and replying to a flurry of messages. When Grindr launched in March 2009, the iPhone was still in its infancy. Back then, the BlackBerry was king.


Dating apps face U.S. inquiry over underage use and sex offenders

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO – A House subcommittee is investigating popular dating services such as Tinder and Bumble for allegedly allowing minors and sex offenders to use their services. Bumble, Grindr, The Meet Group and the Match Group, which owns such popular services as Tinder, Match.com and OkCupid, are the current targets of the investigation by the U.S. House Oversight and Reform subcommittee on economic and consumer policy. In separate letters Thursday to the companies, the subcommittee is seeking information on users' ages, procedures for verifying ages, and any complaints about assaults, rape or the use of the services by minors. It is also asking for the services' privacy policies and details on what users see when they review and agree to the policies. Although the minimum age for using internet services is typically 13 in the U.S., dating services generally require users to be at least 18 because of concerns about sexual predators.


Swiping sucks, so here are 6 dating sites for guys to find love

Mashable

As a 2017 study points out, we used to end up with people who we were somehow connected to, whether friends of friends, classmates, or neighbors. Online dating, however, changed the game, and people who meet through tech-based dating tend to be total strangers. It's not easy to get to know someone through an app, and if you're looking for a relationship, tech-based dating usually means wading through hundreds of profiles looking for a casual fling. If you're a guy looking for love, here are six dating apps and sites that will help you find "the one" -- you just might have to do a lot of searching, first. Coffee Meets Bagel may appeal to singles who are tired of endlessly swiping without any feedback or interest from others.