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MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab Releases Groundbreaking Research on AI and the Future of Work - Liwaiwai

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IBM believes 100% of jobs will eventually change due to artificial intelligence, and new empirical research released last October 30 from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab reveals how. The research, The Future of Work: How New Technologies Are Transforming Tasks, used advanced machine learning techniques to analyze 170 million online job postings in the United States between 2010 and 2017. It shows, in the early stages of AI adoption, how tasks of individual jobs are transforming and the impact on employment and wages. "As new technologies continue to scale within businesses and across industries, it is our responsibility as innovators to understand not only the business process implications, but also the societal impact," said Martin Fleming, vice president and chief economist of IBM. "To that end, this empirical research from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab sheds new light on how tasks are reorganizing between people and machines as a result of AI and new technologies."


Impact of AI on Work - Jobs Are Changing, MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab Says

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IBM has always believed that 100% of jobs will ultimately change due to the impact of AI. Recent empirical research conducted by the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab provides insights into the prediction and explains how it's going to happen. The joint research by Massachusetts Institute of Technology and IBM scrutinized the probable applications of Machine Learning in 170 million online job postings between 2010 and 2017 and came up with a report "The Future of Work: How New Technologies Are Transforming Tasks." The research examined the impact of Artificial Intelligence on employment and inferred that the result will be a significant decrease in the number of tasks. It additionally stated that work that would require "soft skills" would be given more focus on.


New Research from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab Reveals How Work is Transforming IBM Research Blog

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Rapid advancements in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) are uniquely poised to transform entire occupations and industries, changing the way work will be done in the future. It is imperative to understand the extent and nature of the changes so that we can prepare today for the jobs of tomorrow. New empirical work from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab uncovers how jobs will transform as AI and new technologies continue to scale across business and industries. We created a novel dataset using machine learning techniques on 170 million U.S. job postings. The dataset and research, The Future of Work: How New Technologies Are Transforming Tasks, allow us to extract key insights into how AI is shaping the future of work.


To Prepare for Automation, Stay Curious and Don't Stop Learning

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Earlier this year, President Trump signed an executive order for the "American AI Initiative," to guide AI developments and investments in the following areas: research and development, ethical standards, automation, and international outreach. This initiative is indicative of the changing times, and how, as a country, the U.S. is learning to navigate the implications of AI. Leaders in the business world, specifically, are faced with the responsibility of equipping our employees with the skills necessary for paving long-lasting career paths, and the workforce must discover what will be expected as technology continues to disrupt the norm, and work as we know it. As a global business leader, an AI optimist, and a father, I find myself asking: What will make a career sustainable in 2020 and beyond? Will the future of education rise to meet the demands of the future of work?


It's Time for a C-Level Role Dedicated to Reskilling Workers

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Although corporate leaders have talked about skills gaps for years, the spread of automation and artificial intelligence is prompting some of the biggest companies -- including Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, SAP, Walmart, and AT&T, to name just a few -- to take action, not with small pilots but with comprehensive plans to retrain large segments of their workforces. These programs signal that the "future of work" is no longer an event on the distant horizon. Our latest research finds that the occupational mix of the economy is already shifting in ways that will accelerate over the next decade. Although we estimate that only 5% of all occupations can be fully automated, the activities in nearly all jobs will evolve. As intelligent machines take over many physical, repetitive, or basic cognitive tasks, the work that remains will involve both more technical and digital skills and more personal interaction, creativity, and judgment.