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New Way of Defining Alzheimer's Aims to Find Disease Sooner

U.S. News

Another problem: as many as 30 percent of people enrolled in Alzheimer's studies based on symptoms didn't actually have the disease -- they had other forms of dementia or even other medical conditions. That doesn't give an accurate picture of whether a potential treatment might help, and the new definition aims to improve patient selection by using brain scans and other tests.


6 Effective Ways To Prevent Alzheimer's

#artificialintelligence

Alzheimer's disease is on the rise and every 3 seconds, someone in the world seems to have been developing it. Since there is no cure yet to stop or slow down its progression, it can be wise to prevent it in the first place. Nowadays there are several genetic testing companies that can identify your risk for diseases like Alzheimer's. Here are a few ways that can help prevent Alzheimer's: Also, several autopsies have found that a majority of people with Alzheimer's disease also had cardiovascular diseases. It is assumed that plaques and tangles present in the brain can remain in the brain and not show any symptoms unless there is evidence of vascular diseases.


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#artificialintelligence

Out of the total number, 48 were scans of people with the disease, while 48 were scans of people who suffered from mild cognitive impairment and eventually developed full-blown Alzheimer's. The AI was able to diagnose Alzheimer's 86 percent of the time. More importantly, it was able to detect mild cognitive impairment 84 percent of the time, making it a potentially effective tool for early diagnosis. With more samples and further development, though, the AI could become more accurate until it's reliable enough to be used as a non-invasive early detection system.


Sleeping too little is no badge of honour – it harms our brains

New Scientist

IN THE week that the Nobel Prize was deservedly awarded to biologists working on the circadian clock, the importance of their research to life and health has come into even sharper focus. It turns out that regularly failing to get adequate sleep puts us at greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. A single night of poor slumber is enough to see damaging effects in the brain (see "Wake-up call: How a lack of sleep can cause Alzheimer's"). This is worrying news for all of us. The cult of busyness now rules, burning the candle at both ends has become a badge of honour.


How ApoE4 endangers brains

Science

Since 1993, when the apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) genetic variant was found to multiply the risk of the most common form of Alzheimer's disease as much as fourfold, researchers have probed its connections to the protein fragment β-amyloid, the dominant suspect for the cause of the illness. This week, however, a new study showed that ApoE4's most toxic effects may result from a damaging immune response to a different protein, tau. The study shifts the terms of an old debate over whether Alzheimer's disease treatments should focus on tau or amyloid, by suggesting both could be targeted through ApoE4.