Report on the 35th Annual Cognitive Science Conference

AI Magazine

Cognitive scientists with varied backgrounds gathered in Berlin to report on and discuss expanding lines of research, spanning multiple fields but striving in one direction: to understand cognition with all its properties and peculiarities. A rich program featuring keynotes, symposia, workshops, and tutorials, along with regular oral and poster sessions, offered the attendees a vivid and exciting overview of where the discipline is going while serving as a fertile forum of interdisciplinary discussion and exchange. This report attempts to point out why this should matter to artificial intelligence as a whole. Although the conference has been the major international venue for cognitive science research for a long time, appealing to all seven discipline pillars -- anthropology, artificial intelligence, education, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology -- this year's edition topped every past meeting in terms of number of participants. An impressive figure of more than 1000 accepted contributions, divided among oral presentations (274), posters (685), symposia, workshops, and tutorials, could be accommodated in the program only by increasing the number of parallel sessions to 11 and enlarging the three poster sessions.


Report on the Thirty-Fifth Annual Cognitive Science Conference

AI Magazine

COGSCI2013, the 35th annual meeting of the Cognitive Science Society and the first to take place in Germany, was held from the 31st of July to the 3rd of August. Cognitive scientists with varied backgrounds gathered in Berlin to report and discuss on expanding lines of research, spanning multiple fields but striving in one direction: to understand cognition with all its properties and peculiarities. A rich program featuring keynotes, symposia, workshops and tutorials, along regular oral and poster sessions, offered the attendees a vivid and exciting overview of where the discipline is going while serving as a fertile forum of interdisciplinary discussion and exchange. This report attempts to point out why this should matter to artificial intelligence as a whole.


Mechanical Mind » American Scientist

AITopics Original Links

Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. The term cognitive science, which gained currency in the last half of the 20th century, is used to refer to the study of cognition--cognitive structures and processes in the mind or brain, mostly in people rather than, say, rats or insects. Cognitive science in this sense has reflected a growing rejection of behaviorism in favor of the study of mind and "human information processing." The field includes the study of thinking, perception, emotion, creativity, language, consciousness and learning. Sometimes it has involved writing (or at least thinking about) computer programs that attempt to model mental processes or that provide tools such as spreadsheets, theorem provers, mathematical-equation solvers and engines for searching the Web.


Achieving Human-Level Intelligence through Integrated Systems and Research

AI Magazine

This special issue is based on the premise that in order to achieve human-level artificial intelligence researchers will have to find ways to integrate insights from multiple computational frameworks and to exploit insights from other fields that study intelligence. Articles in this issue describe recent approaches for integrating algorithms and data structures from diverse subfields of AI. Much of this work incorporates insights from neuroscience, social and cognitive psychology or linguistics. The new applications and significant improvements to existing applications this work has enabled demonstrates the ability of integrated systems and research to continue progress towards human-level artificial intelligence. However, we believe that progress towards human-level artificial intelligence and the applications it enables requires a deeper and more comprehensive understanding that cannot be achieved by studying individual areas in isolation.


Achieving Human-Level Intelligence through Integrated Systems and Research: Introduction to This Special Issue

AI Magazine

This special issue is based on the premise that in order to achieve human-level artificial intelligence researchers will have to find ways to integrate insights from multiple computational frameworks and to exploit insights from other fields that study intelligence. Articles in this issue describe recent approaches for integrating algorithms and data structures from diverse subfields of AI. Much of this work incorporates insights from neuroscience, social and cognitive psychology or linguistics. The new applications and significant improvements to existing applications this work has enabled demonstrates the ability of integrated systems and research to continue progress towards human-level artificial intelligence.