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Unlocking Public Sector Artificial Intelligence

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Guidelines for the responsible and effective procurement of artificial intelligence by governments to better meet the needs of citizens and enhance public servicesThe challenge Artificial intelligence (AI) holds the potential to vastly improve government operations and help meet the needs of citizens in new ways, ranging from traffic management to healthcare delivery to processing tax forms. But most public institutions have not yet adopted this powerful technology. While public sector officials are increasingly aware of the transformational impact of data and AI-powered solutions, the data needed for AI solutions to be developed and deployed is often neither accessible nor discoverable. Public sector officials may also lack the appropriate knowledge and expertise to make strategic buying decisions for AI-powered tools. Uncertainty about ethical considerations adds further layers of complexity. As a result, officials tend to delay buying decisions, or reduce perceived risk by concentrating their purchasing on a few known suppliers. The opportunity The World Economic Forum’s Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution has brought together a multistakeholder community to co-design the AI Procurement in a Box toolkit guide for governments to rethink their public procurement processes:  IntroductionGuidelines for AI procurement, presenting the general considerations to be taken when government is procuring AI-powered solutionsWorkbook for policy and procurement officials guiding them through the guidelines ChallengesPilot case studiesThis guidance aims to empower government officials to more confidently make responsible AI purchasing decisions. The tools also improve the experience for AI solutions providers by supporting the creation of transparent and innovative public procurement processes that meet their needs. Impact By co-designing these guidelines with governments, small and large businesses, civil society and academia, the intended impact is the responsible deployment of AI solutions for the public benefit of constituents. Leveraging the significant purchasing power of government in the market, the private-sector adoption of the guidelines can permeate the industry beyond the adoption by public sector organizations. Embedding the principles advocated for in the guidelines into administrative processes will also expand opportunities for new entrants and create a more competitive environment for the ethical development of AI. Further, as industry debates its own standards on these technologies, the government’s influence can help set a baseline for the harmonization of standards-setting. Project accomplishments  March–September 2019: Policy development – the World Economic Forum worked with fellows from the public and private sectors, and a multistakeholder group that also included academia and civil society organizations, to create action-orientated guidelines for government procurement of AI. October–March 2020: Pilot and Iteration – the project team validated guidelines through feedback sessions and a pilot project with the United Kingdom government, the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority and the Government of Bahrain. June 2020: Publication of the AI Procurement in a Box guide that will allow governments to effectively learn and adopt the best practices developed.Contact information For more information, contact Kay Firth-Butterfield, Head of AI and Machine Learning, World Economic Forum, at Kay.Firth-Butterfield@weforum.org.


Unlocking Public Sector Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The challenge Artificial intelligence (AI) holds the potential to vastly improve government operations and help meet the needs of citizens in new ways, ranging from traffic management to healthcare delivery to processing tax forms. But most public institutions have not yet adopted this powerful technology. While public sector officials are increasingly aware of the transformational impact of data and AI-powered solutions, the data needed for AI solutions to be developed and deployed is often neither accessible nor discoverable. Public sector officials may also lack the appropriate knowledge and expertise to make strategic buying decisions for AI-powered tools. Uncertainty about ethical considerations adds further layers of complexity. As a result, officials tend to delay buying decisions, or reduce perceived risk by concentrating their purchasing on a few known suppliers. The opportunity The World Economic Forum’s Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution has brought together a multistakeholder community to co-design the AI Procurement in a Box toolkit guide for governments to rethink their public procurement processes:  IntroductionGuidelines for AI procurement, presenting the general considerations to be taken when government is procuring AI-powered solutionsWorkbook for policy and procurement officials guiding them through the guidelines ChallengesPilot case studiesThis guidance aims to empower government officials to more confidently make responsible AI purchasing decisions. The tools also improve the experience for AI solutions providers by supporting the creation of transparent and innovative public procurement processes that meet their needs. Impact By co-designing these guidelines with governments, small and large businesses, civil society and academia, the intended impact is the responsible deployment of AI solutions for the public benefit of constituents. Leveraging the significant purchasing power of government in the market, the private-sector adoption of the guidelines can permeate the industry beyond the adoption by public sector organizations. Embedding the principles advocated for in the guidelines into administrative processes will also expand opportunities for new entrants and create a more competitive environment for the ethical development of AI. Further, as industry debates its own standards on these technologies, the government’s influence can help set a baseline for the harmonization of standards-setting. Project accomplishments  March–September 2019: Policy development – the World Economic Forum worked with fellows from the public and private sectors, and a multistakeholder group that also included academia and civil society organizations, to create action-orientated guidelines for government procurement of AI. October–March 2020: Pilot and Iteration – the project team validated guidelines through feedback sessions and a pilot project with the United Kingdom government, the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority and the Government of Bahrain. June 2020: Publication of the AI Procurement in a Box guide that will allow governments to effectively learn and adopt the best practices developed. Contact information For more information, contact Kay Firth-Butterfield, Head of AI and Machine Learning, World Economic Forum, at Kay.Firth-Butterfield@weforum.org.


The importance of AI governance and 5 key principles for its guidance

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The advent of artificial intelligence and machine learning has introduced a new set of challenges to the world. As algorithms seem to have a bias problem in the used data training, big tech isn't doing enough to fix it. This has led to an increased need for general governance policies that protect the people and the planet while also ensuring that cultural differences are taken into consideration. So, why it is important to talk about AI governance, and what can be done so AI stays on track with social responsibility as technology advances and changes in time? This article will dive deep into the answers and will establish 5 key dimensions that need to be addressed by organizations to make sure AI governance is safely and fairly established and what are its limitations.AI is a major factor in the future of our society, but who decides? AI is one of the most captivating segment of technology.


The AI Ethics Journey Will Hit New Heights in 2021

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The Department of Defense adopted its Ethical Principles for Artificial Intelligence in February 2020, a first for any military organization. These principles build on the foundational work performed by the Defense Innovation Board and is tied directly to one of the pillars of the DoD AI Strategy: Leading in military ethics and safety. The Joint Artificial Intelligence Center serves as the Department's lead for coordinating the oversight and implementation of these principles. Alka Patel, head of AI Ethics Policy for the JAIC, focuses on how to operationalize the five DoD AI Ethics Principles (Responsible, Equitable, Traceable, Reliable and Governable) and put them into practice in the design, development, deployment, and use of AI-enabled capabilities. However, to operationalize these principles throughout the DoD, the JAIC is turning to Responsible AI – an enterprise-wide framework that provides the DoD workforce and the American public the confidence that DoD AI-enabled systems will be safe and reliable, and will adhere to ethical standards.


Responsible AI Programs To Follow And Implement-- Breakout Year 2021

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Responsible usage of AI is growing extensively since 2017 and 2021 will see expansion fully into the operationalization of AI ethical principles, frameworks, and policies. Operationalization defined as taking principles into useful practice and thus requiring prioritization for businesses. The challenge is focusing on the top initiatives which I will identify in this article. In my pro bono contributions across 100 global programs with non-profits, I am seeing businesses are still challenged in moving from proof-of-concept responsible AI applications, within one business unit, to scaling across the enterprise. With more than 300 AI principles, frameworks, policy, and regulatory initiatives--businesses must keep current of the top contenders as AI usage grows.