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Your AI Efforts Won't Succeed Unless They Benefit Employees

#artificialintelligence

Automation and AI are often perceived by companies that leverage them as an important source of labor productivity. Many workers in such companies, however, tend to see the adoption of these and other technologies as putting their jobs in jeopardy or creating more stressful workplaces. Recent research highlights the dichotomy. While increased robot use contributed approximately 0.4 percentage points to annual labor productivity growth in major developed countries from 1980 to 2014, every additional robot per thousand workers that was deployed in the same period reduced the employment-to-population ratio by about 0.2–0.3 While information and communications technology in the same period and same countries contributed to one-third of total economic growth, technology diffusion in enterprises has contributed in likely the same proportion to increased worker stress.


How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Your Health and Productivity

#artificialintelligence

An unhealthy, dangerous or otherwise toxic workspace is known to deter workers from innovation and damage a company's reputation. Entrepreneurs have a responsibility to ensure that working environments keep employees safe, satisfied and positive so they can remain productive and innovative on the job. With the focus on workplace health management programs, along with the emergence of AI technologies, it's crucial to understand how these disruptive tools will affect the health -- mental, social and physical -- of workers across various sectors. AI is promising to change the way workplaces operate, but will it be a force for good or disrupt workplace culture in negative ways? With the expectation that AI will create a $190.6 billion market by 2025, it could be a tool used to provide healthier, more productive, and accessible work environments for all employees.


How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Your Health and Productivity

#artificialintelligence

An unhealthy, dangerous or otherwise toxic workspace is known to deter workers from innovation and damage a company's reputation. Entrepreneurs have a responsibility to ensure that working environments keep employees safe, satisfied and positive so they can remain productive and innovative on the job. With the focus on workplace health management programs, along with the emergence of AI technologies, it's crucial to understand how these disruptive tools will affect the health -- mental, social and physical -- of workers across various sectors. AI is promising to change the way workplaces operate, but will it be a force for good or disrupt workplace culture in negative ways? With the expectation that AI will create a $190.6 billion market by 2025, it could be a tool used to provide healthier, more productive, and accessible work environments for all employees.


Will AI Save You From Bad Managers In The Future Of Work?

#artificialintelligence

The world of business has a unhealthy attraction to chaos theory. Popular culture has driven companies and large cohorts of management into adopting chaos as their modus operandi. Amateur managers often resort to tactical game theory learnt as part of their management courses to compensate for lack of true insights into their workforce. This has created a crisis in team management for a workforce that was already struggling with bias, secrecy and general lack of trust. Will AI save us from bad management?


Are performance-monitoring wearables an affront to workers' rights?

Washington Post - Technology News

At U.K. supermarket chain Tesco, workers wear sensor-bearing armbands to track inventory while unloading goods. "Pickers" that put together orders at Amazon.com warehouses wear GPS tags designed to guide them on the most efficient warehouse route. All of these wearable devices are designed to monitor worker productivity, combining man and machine for maximum efficiency. Wearables have been long used to help monitor an individual's health and fitness. But now wearable use is becoming increasingly common in the workplace to record, analyze and enhance worker productivity, raising concerns among lawyers and labor specialists who feel that it's a step toward stripping employees of workplace rights.