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Back from the dead: Haunting reconstruction lets you look into the eyes of a Neolithic man who was beheaded 9,500 years ago

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Archaeologists have reconstructed the ancient man's head in plaster He once lived in Jericho, a holy city now in the Palestinian territories The man was subjected to a brutal burial ritual in which his head was removed The model will be exhibited at London's British museum from next week Archaeologists have reconstructed the ancient man's head in plaster The model will be exhibited at London's British museum from next week Archaeologists from the British museum have reconstructed an ancient man's face, allowing visitors to see what he looked like for the first time. Father, 65, finds what could be an Ice Age BOBCAT in his... Like nothing on Earth: An'impossible' crystal is discovered... The world's oldest cancer case: Tumor found in the mouth of... Proof that dinosaurs shook a tail-feather: Incredible 99... Father, 65, finds what could be an Ice Age BOBCAT in his... Like nothing on Earth: An'impossible' crystal is discovered... The world's oldest cancer case: Tumor found in the mouth of... Proof that dinosaurs shook a tail-feather: Incredible 99... Plastered skulls were a traditional form of ritual burial in Jericho at the time. Pictured here is the original Jericho skull, with the darker regions showing the plaster stuffed into the severed head.


Hints of Skull Cult Found at World's Oldest Temple

National Geographic News

Göbekli Tepe, site of the possible skull cult, is considerd the world's oldest temple. Around 10,000 years ago, the already striking presence of Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey could have been even more impressive--as human skulls might have dangled in what is considered the world's oldest temple. According to new research published in Science Advances, three Neolithic skull fragments discovered by archaeologists at Göbekli Tepe show evidence of a unique type of post-mortem skull modification at the site. The deep, purposeful linear grooves are a unique form of skull alteration never before seen anywhere in the world in any context, says Julia Gresky, lead author on the study and an anthropologist at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. Detailed analysis with a special microscope shows the grooves were deliberately made with a flint tool.


5,000-Year-Old Cosmetics, Jewelry Show Rise of Ancient Jericho

National Geographic

The 3,800-year-old burial of an aristocratic young girl adorned with bronze jewelry and Egyptian scarabs shows century-long links between Jericho and Egypt.