Reality Check: Do Labour's sums add up on free school meals?

BBC News

The claim: The Independent Schools Council says Labour's plan to fund free school meals for all primary school children in England by charging VAT on private school fees doesn't add up financially. Reality Check verdict: Unless increased fees led to large numbers of children switching from private to state schools, there's no reason Labour's plans would not work financially. Jeremy Corbyn says Labour would provide a free school meal for every primary school child in England, which he would fund by charging VAT on private school fees. The Independent Schools Council (ISC), which represents private schools, says Mr Corbyn's sums don't add up. At the moment, every primary school child up to about the age of seven - Year 2 - automatically gets a free lunch at school.


Reality Check: How many children are in classes of more than 30?

BBC News

The claim: Speaking in Swindon, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: "Half a million children are now being taught in super-size classes of over 36." Reality Check verdict: This is incorrect. Actually about 42,000 pupils are in classes of 36 or more - about 1% of children. Mr Corbyn appears to be confusing statistics. It is right, as the earlier Labour press release said, to say about half a million pupils in state-funded primary schools in England are in classes of between 31 and 35.


School choking death: Boy named as Theodore Silvester

BBC News

A five-year-old boy who is believed to have choked to death during a dinner break at a school in Hull has been named by police. Theodore Silvester, who was a foundation pupil, was taken ill at Anlaby Primary School on Friday lunchtime. Paramedics were called to the school, but he was later pronounced dead. A post-mortem examination is yet to take place, but the death is not being treated as suspicious. On Saturday, head teacher Gareth May said the whole school community was "deeply saddened by this tragic event".


The new Sats: How are they different?

BBC News

The results of a new set of compulsory national tests for children in the final year of primary school in England are being published. But how are they different from the old tests? The tests sat by primary school children this year are new because they are the first to test the new national primary curriculum. This covers different material from the old one and has been taught in schools only since 2014. Therefore a totally new set of tests has been developed to measure attainment in three subjects; maths, reading, and spelling, grammar and punctuation.


Primary school's edible playground a hit with pupils

BBC News

In order to promote healthy eating and sustainability, the Trees for Cities charity has teamed up with a school in Tower Hamlets in London's East End to provide kids with a place to grow their own fruit and veg.