An Overview of Startups Advancing the Deep Learning in Healthcare Revolution

#artificialintelligence

During the Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit in London last week we hosted the'Shaping Tomorrow' startup session to showcase innovative startups applying cutting-edge deep learning algorithms and tools to advance healthcare and medicine. Daria Danilina, an MBA student from London Business School, attended the event and kindly summarised the startup presentations. Key take-away: Humans are trained to identify certain patterns. However, we tend to overlook things which we do not expect to see or are not trained to detect. In addition to this, anomalies exist that are impossible to identify for human eyes, such as tumours composed of soft tissue.


Artificial intelligence uncovers new insight into biophysics of cancer

#artificialintelligence

Their machine-learning platform predicted a trio of reagents that was able to generate a never-before-seen cancer-like phenotype in tadpoles. The research, reported in Scientific Reports on January 27, shows how artificial intelligence (AI) can help human researchers in fields such as oncology and regenerative medicine control complex biological systems to reach new and previously unachievable outcomes. The researchers had previously shown that pigment cells (melanocytes) in developing frogs could be converted to a cancer-like, metastatic form by disrupting their normal bioelectric and serotonergic signaling and had used AI to reverse-engineer a model that explained this complex process. However, during these extensive experiments, the biologists observed something remarkable: All the melanocytes in a single frog larva either converted to the cancer-like form or remained completely normal. Conversion of only some of the pigment cells in a single tadpole was never seen; how, the researchers asked, could such an all-or-none coordination of cells across the tadpole body be explained and controlled?


Artificial intelligence uncovers new insight into biophysics of cancer

#artificialintelligence

Their machine-learning platform predicted a trio of reagents that was able to generate a never-before-seen cancer-like phenotype in tadpoles. The research, reported in Scientific Reports on January 27, shows how artificial intelligence (AI) can help human researchers in fields such as oncology and regenerative medicine control complex biological systems to reach new and previously unachievable outcomes. The researchers had previously shown that pigment cells (melanocytes) in developing frogs could be converted to a cancer-like, metastatic form by disrupting their normal bioelectric and serotonergic signaling and had used AI to reverse-engineer a model that explained this complex process. However, during these extensive experiments, the biologists observed something remarkable: All the melanocytes in a single frog larva either converted to the cancer-like form or remained completely normal. Conversion of only some of the pigment cells in a single tadpole was never seen; how, the researchers asked, could such an all-or-none coordination of cells across the tadpole body be explained and controlled?


Update on Artificial Intelligence and Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

In a recent interview, AthenaHealth CEO Jonathan Bush noted the limitations of traditional doctors and said, "The human is wrong so freaking often, it's a massacre." "By 2025, AI systems could be involved in everything from population health management, to digital avatars capable of answering specific patient queries." Stephen Hawking has said the development of full Artificial Intelligence (AI) could spell the end of the human race โ€“ and Elon Musk agreed. In a recent interview, AthenaHealth CEO Jonathan Bush noted the limitations of traditional doctors and said, "The human is wrong so freaking often, it's a massacre." "By 2025, AI systems could be involved in everything from population health management, to digital avatars capable of answering specific patient queries."


The artificial intelligence revolutionising healthcare

#artificialintelligence

Last year, it was reported that supercomputer IBM Watson diagnosed a rare form of leukaemia in a patient at a University of Tokyo-affiliated hospital whose case had baffled her medical team. The cloud-based, artificial intelligence-powered supercomputer is capable of cross-referencing and analysing data from tens of millions of oncology papers from research institutes all over the world. From vast volumes of data, it can instantly pull out the information it needs, much faster than humans can. The University of Tokyo reported that the 60-year-old Japanese woman was correctly diagnosed in just 10 minutes by Watson, after her genetic data was cross-referenced with the computer's own database. More and more, health technologies originally viewed as futuristic โ€“ like virtual avatars and chatbots โ€“ have become reality.