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5G: The Next Generation of Mobile Connectivity

#artificialintelligence

Just before the smartphone revolution, Nokia was by far the world's most popular mobile handset manufacturer. However, despite selling 250 million units of its two most popular block-shaped models in the mid-2000s, the Finnish company ended up being woefully late to the smartphone party. Not only was the company ill-equipped to match the iPhone and Blackberry in terms of technology and design features, but Nokia also failed to foresee how exponential advances in mobile connectivity would change how people ultimately used their devices. As true broadband connectivity shaped the mobile experience, the phone was no longer just a phone – it was transformed into a seamless hub for any and all digital activity. In the coming years, the newest generation of mobile connectivity – 5G – will roll out and change what is possible again.


Expanding Internet connectivity for global development

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

It is important to note that the sharp rise in Internet adoption in low and middle-income countries has been achieved in strong part by the spread of mobile broadband via macro cellular connectivity. Already over 90% of the world's population is covered by 2G mobile signals, and over two-thirds is covered by 3G connectivity which provides sufficient bandwidth for rich Internet browsing and video streaming. But to further increase adoption, partnerships such as the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) as well as the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL), are focusing attention and effort on the policy issues and the digital tools needed to expand Internet access. As the global community coalesces around major efforts to extend access to every person on the planet, such partnerships will be key to ensure coordination and complementary action. The ICT4Development conference last week and the new report launched today stress the importance of ICTs and reiterate the need to expand Internet connectivity for global development.


5G: The Next Generation of Mobile Connectivity

#artificialintelligence

Just before the smartphone revolution, Nokia was by far the world's most popular mobile handset manufacturer. However, despite selling 250 million units of its two most popular block-shaped models in the mid-2000s, the Finnish company ended up being woefully late to the smartphone party. Not only was the company ill-equipped to match the iPhone and Blackberry in terms of technology and design features, but Nokia also failed to foresee how exponential advances in mobile connectivity would change how people ultimately used their devices. As true broadband connectivity shaped the mobile experience, the phone was no longer just a phone – it was transformed into a seamless hub for any and all digital activity. In the coming years, the newest generation of mobile connectivity – 5G – will roll out and change what is possible again.


Belkin's 3.5mm to Lightning cable delivers retro connectivity

Engadget

Apple doing away with the iPhone's headphone jack was supposed to make life a bit more streamlined, and while in many cases it has, it still presented something of a headache for those who wanted to use their device to listen to music in the car, or even just to use their favourite headphones while charging their phones. Finding a decent 3.5mm cable with a Lightning connector is no mean feat, which is likely why Belkin has stepped up to the plate with its latest cable offering. The company's new 3.5mm audio to Lightning connector comes in two lengths and lets you connect your iPhone directly to your car stereo or home speakers with a single cable. Now, for a wire that replicates the work of an old-school jack-to-jack cable -- which could be picked up for next to nothing -- it's not cheap: $30 for the three-foot cable and $35 for the six-foot. But it's Belkin, so you know it's going to do a good job at letting you revel in retro connectivity for a while longer.


Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data

Neural Information Processing Systems

Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques provide great potentials for effective diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Previous studies have shown that AD is closely related to the alternation in the functional brain network, i.e., the functional connectivity among different brain regions. In this paper, we consider the problem of learning functional brain connectivity from neuroimaging, which holds great promise for identifying image-based markers used to distinguish Normal Controls (NC), patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and patients with AD. More specifically, we study sparse inverse covariance estimation (SICE), also known as exploratory Gaussian graphical models, for brain connectivity modeling. In particular, we apply SICE to learn and analyze functional brain connectivity patterns from different subject groups, based on a key property of SICE, called the "monotone property" we established in this paper. Our experimental results on neuroimaging PET data of 42 AD, 116 MCI, and 67 NC subjects reveal several interesting connectivity patterns consistent with literature findings, and also some new patterns that can help the knowledge discovery of AD.