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Futuristic AI-Based Computing Devices: Physicists Simulate Artificial Brain Networks With New Quantum Materials

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Like biologically based systems (left), complex emergent behaviors--which arise when separate components are merged together in a coordinated system--also result from neuromorphic networks made up of quantum-materials-based devices (right). Pandemic lockdown forces a new perspective on designs for futuristic AI-based computing devices. Isaac Newton's groundbreaking scientific productivity while isolated from the spread of bubonic plague is legendary. University of California San Diego physicists can now claim a stake in the annals of pandemic-driven science. A team of UC San Diego researchers and colleagues at Purdue University have now simulated the foundation of new types of artificial intelligence computing devices that mimic brain functions, an achievement that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.


Researchers discover unique material design for brain-like computations

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Over the past few decades, computers have seen dramatic progress in processing power; however, even the most advanced computers are relatively rudimentary in comparison with the complexities and capabilities of the human brain. Researchers at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory say this may be changing as they endeavor to design computers inspired by the human brain's neural structure. As part of a collaboration with Lehigh University, Army researchers have identified a design strategy for the development of neuromorphic materials. "Neuromorphic materials is a name given to the material categories or combination of materials that provide both computing and memory capabilities in devices," said Dr. Sina Najmaei, a research scientist and electrical engineer with the laboratory. Najmaei and his colleagues published a paper, Dynamically reconfigurable electronic and phononic properties in intercalated Hafnium Disulfide (HfS2), in the May 2020 issue of Materials Today.


Neuromophic Computing

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I saw a video article on Neuromorphic Computing the other day - something I had not really heard much about, though it ties in heavily to Artificial Intelligence which I, of course, do know about. Wow.. the possibilities are now endless. This is what Techopedia says about Neuromorphic Computing... Neuromorphic computing utilizes an engineering approach or method based on the activity of the biological brain. This type of approach can make technologies more versatile and adaptable, and promote more vibrant results than other types of traditional architectures, for instance, the von Neumann architecture that is so useful in traditional hardware design. Neuromorphic computing is also known as neuromorphic engineering.


Making AI-Powered Devices Smart Using Neuromorphic Computing

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AI is powering smart products that are transforming industries with increased demand from customer-end and business-end. As per Accenture's report, one smart home product division is projected to be worth US$135 billion by 2035. Soon, everything around us will be "smart" with devices that can be controlled by voice and gesture. From home entertainment to interiors and home improvement, devices will have increased autonomy freeing us of mundane activities. Robot vacuums have already started to take their place in homes, but imagine it replacing human cleaners at department stores?


Intel Scales Neuromorphic Research System to 100 Million Neurons Intel Newsroom

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What's New: Today, Intel announced the readiness of Pohoiki Springs, its latest and most powerful neuromorphic research system providing the computational capacity of 100 million neurons. The cloud-based system will be made available to members of the Intel Neuromorphic Research Community (INRC), extending their neuromorphic work to solve larger, more complex problems. The system enables our research partners to explore ways to accelerate workloads that run slowly today on conventional architectures, including high-performance computing (HPC) systems." What It is: Pohoiki Springs is a data center rack-mounted system and is Intel's largest neuromorphic computing system developed to date. Loihi processors take inspiration from the human brain.