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Column: A tax reform President Trump should like, and you should too

PBS NewsHour

Yevgeniy Feyman and Charles Blahous, co-authors of the recent Mercatus study "Replacing the Cadillac Tax," make the case for eliminating the tax exemption for employer-provided health insurance. Everyone seems to think it's necessary. But few agree on exactly -- or even approximately -- how to do it. But for all the arguments, claim conservative authors Yevgeniy Feyman and Charles Blahous, economists largely agree on one reform: ditching the tax exemption for health insurance. Ongoing efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act embody a rare opportunity to address not only problems that have arisen under the ACA, but other severe health policy problems that long preceded it.


Facing big political hurdles, House Republicans ready an ambitious legislative push to repeal Obamacare

Los Angeles Times

House Republicans, despite stiff political headwinds, are readying an ambitious push this week to begin moving legislation to replace major parts of the Affordable Care Act, a crucial test of their ability to fulfill one of their party's main campaign promises. The plan marks the first time GOP lawmakers will do this since Obamacare was enacted seven years ago and will provide an early indication of whether President Trump can rally his party's members of Congress, many of whom are anxious about how to repeal and replace the healthcare law. The legislation could affect health insurance for tens of millions of Americans -- not only those with Obamacare coverage, but also people with employer-provided insurance and Medicaid. The House legislation -- which was being finalized over the weekend, according to GOP officials -- aims to fundamentally restructure the system that Obamacare created, which has extended health coverage to more than 20 million previously uninsured Americans. GOP plans call for scrapping insurance marketplaces that require insurers to offer a basic set of benefits and that provide government subsidies to help low- and moderate-income Americans who don't get health benefits at work to buy health plans.


House GOP readies ambitious push to repeal Obamacare, but many hurdles remain

Los Angeles Times

House Republicans, despite stiff political headwinds, are readying an ambitious push this week to begin moving legislation to replace major parts of the Affordable Care Act, a crucial test of their ability to fulfill one of their party's main campaign promises. The plan marks the first time GOP lawmakers will do this since Obamacare was enacted seven years ago and will provide an early indication of whether President Trump can rally his party's members of Congress, many of whom are anxious about how to repeal and replace the healthcare law. The legislation could affect health insurance for tens of millions of Americans -- not only those with Obamacare coverage, but also people with employer-provided insurance and Medicaid. The House legislation -- which was being finalized over the weekend, according to GOP officials -- aims to fundamentally restructure the system that Obamacare created, which has extended health coverage to more than 20 million previously uninsured Americans. GOP plans call for scrapping insurance marketplaces that require insurers to offer a basic set of benefits and that provide government subsidies to help low- and moderate-income Americans who don't get health benefits at work to buy health plans.


Column: The health insurance tax exemption makes care more affordable, not less

PBS NewsHour

Public policy professor Joe White replies to Yevgeniy Feyman and Charles Blahous's argument that the health insurance tax exemption induces people to buy too much health care. Editor's note: In yesterday's Making Sen$e post on the health insurance tax exemption, conservative authors Yevgeniy Feyman and Charles Blahous put forward a familiar economic argument: that the exemption induces us, the people of the United States of America, to buy too much health care -- because it's subsidized. And they challenged liberals by insisting the tax exemption is regressive as well. It shows, he says, that they didn't do their homework. You may have been surprised to read in a recent Making Sen$e column, "A tax reform President Trump should like, and you should too," that health care is so expensive in the United States because Americans have too much insurance.