The Best AI Still Flunks 8th Grade Science

#artificialintelligence

In 2012, IBM Watson went to medical school. So said The New York Times, announcing that the tech giant's artificially intelligent question-and-answer machine had begun a "stint as a medical student" at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. This was just a metaphor. Clinicians were helping IBM train Watson for use in medical research. But as metaphors go, it wasn't a very good one.


Goldman Sachs-backed imaging startup partners with MIT, Harvard for machine learning

#artificialintelligence

Medical imaging is expected to be one of the early useful applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning in healthcare. And a slew of deals have been built around that premise in the last year or so--IBM Watson Health bought cloud-based imaging company Merge for 1 billion; Philips partnered with Hitachi to incorporate AI into its image management; and GE added deep learning software from startup Arterys to its cardiac imaging. Now, another major cloud-based imaging startup is working to incorporate machine learning, first into X-ray analysis and eventually into other imaging modalities including CT and MRI. The Goldman Sachs-backed startup Imaging Advantage, which reportedly tapped into up to 250 million in debt in January 2015, has partnered with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital to develop an artificial intelligence engine known as Singularity Healthcare. The result is expected to launch this quarter.


You'll have to figure this one out for yourselves.

#artificialintelligence

Estimated differences: Adjusted mortality: 11.07% Regarding the number of regression parameters: Not explicitly listed, but by the following paragraph, I would suspect there are at least hundreds of regression parameters (such as an indicator of medical of school attended). "We accounted for patient characteristics, physician characteristics, and hospital fixed effects. Patient characteristics included patient age in 5-year increments (the oldest group was categorized as 95 years), sex, race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and other), primary diagnosis (Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group), 27 coexisting conditions (determined using the Elixhauser comorbidity index28), median annual household income estimated from residential zip codes (in deciles), an indicator variable for Medicaid coverage, and indicator variables for year. Physician characteristics included physician age in 5-year increments (the oldest group was categorized as 70 years), indicator variables for the medical schools from which the physicians graduated, and type of medical training (ie, allopathic vs osteopathic29 training)."


Better Together

#artificialintelligence

Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. A research team from Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and recently developed artificial intelligence (AI) methods aimed at training computers to interpret pathology images, with the long-term goal of building AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate. "Our AI method is based on deep learning, a machine-learning algorithm used for a range of applications including speech recognition and image recognition," explained pathologist Andrew Beck, HMS associate professor of pathology and director of bioinformatics at the Cancer Research Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess. "This approach teaches machines to interpret the complex patterns and structure observed in real-life data by building multi-layer artificial neural networks, in a process which is thought to show similarities with the learning process that occurs in layers of neurons in the brain's neocortex, the region where thinking occurs."


AI achieves near-human accuracy in diagnosing cancer

#artificialintelligence

New research suggests that computer models could help doctors achieve greater accuracy in the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. A research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system which is able to train computers to analyse pathologic image data [PDF]. The scientists hope that the programme could one day aid in diagnosing disease. 'Our AI method is based on deep learning, a machine-learning algorithm used for a range of applications including speech recognition and image recognition,' explained Andrew Beck, director of bioinformatics at the Cancer Research Institute at BIDMC and associate professor at HMS. He added: 'This approach teaches machines to interpret the complex patterns and structure observed in real-life data by building multi-layer artificial neural networks, in a process which is thought to show similarities with the learning process that occurs in layers of neurons in the brain's neocortex, the region where thinking occurs.'