Facebook's Facial Recognition Software Is Different From The FBI's. Here's Why

NPR Technology

Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. When someone tags you in a photo on Facebook, it's often a nice reminder of a shared memory.


Facial recognition could strike at our right to privacy

Daily Mail

There are few sights more dispiriting than a long queue at ticket offices or machines when you're rushing to catch a train. However, technology is now offering an ingenious solution. A facial recognition system is being developed that uses two invisible, near-infrared lights flashing at high speed to help a single camera capture a 3-D image of a face in astonishing detail. It will register the smallest details, down to tiny blemishes and wrinkles, and can recognise individuals even if they are wearing glasses or moving quickly along a platform. The image can then be checked against a customer database.


Facebook wants your face data -- in the name of privacy, it says

Washington Post - Technology News

Facebook will let you know when someone posts a photo of you -- even if you aren't tagged in it -- becoming the latest tech giant to add more facial recognition technology into users' everyday lives.


Facial recognition tech sucks, but it's inevitable

#artificialintelligence

These are just some of the questions being raised by lawmakers, civil libertarians, and privacy advocates in the wake of an ACLU report released last summer that claimed Amazon's facial recognition software, Rekognition, misidentified 28 members of congress as criminals. Rekognition is a general-purpose, application programming interface (API) developers can use to build applications that can detect and analyze scenes, objects, faces, and other items within images. The source of the controversy was a pilot program in which Amazon teamed up with the police departments of two cities, Orlando, Florida and Washington County, Oregon, to explore the use of facial recognition in law enforcement. In January 2019, the Daily Mail reported that the FBI has been testing Rekognition since early 2018. The Project on Government Oversight also revealed via a Freedom of Information Act request that Amazon had also pitched Rekognition to ICE in June 2018.