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The Value of Citizen Data Scientists (and how to empower them) » techsocialnetwork

#artificialintelligence

In the past few years, demand for employees with data-based skills has increased. In fact, Tech HQ notes that between 2013 and 2018 demand for data scientists jumped 344%, and IBM predicts that by 2020 demand will rise 28%. But there's a problem: there are not enough data scientists to meet this demand. Due to this industry shortage, companies have begun to upskill citizen data scientists to fill in the gaps. The term was first coined by Gartner who defines a citizen data scientist as "a person who creates or generates models that use advanced diagnostic analytics or predictive and prescriptive capabilities, but whose primary job function is outside the field of statistics and analytics."


The rise of the citizen data scientist

#artificialintelligence

When Mark Pickett was a captain in the Marines, he knew he couldn't be there to make every decision for his soldiers. "You can't rehearse every scenario, and there will be times when you can't communicate," he explained. "You want to groom your Marines to be able to rely on themselves and their unit." Now senior director for online analytics and business intelligence at Sears, Pickett has been an early champion of the so-called citizen data scientist movement, by which employees in multiple parts of an organization are empowered with the analytics tools and skills to get the answers they need from their data. "The business understands the business more deeply than we ever could," he said.


The rise of the citizen data scientist

PCWorld

When Mark Pickett was a captain in the Marines, he knew he couldn't be there to make every decision for his soldiers. "You can't rehearse every scenario, and there will be times when you can't communicate," he explained. "You want to groom your Marines to be able to rely on themselves and their unit." Now senior director for online analytics and business intelligence at Sears, Pickett has been an early champion of the so-called citizen data scientist movement, by which employees in multiple parts of an organization are empowered with the analytics tools and skills to get the answers they need from their data. "The business understands the business more deeply than we ever could," he said.


Democratising data to bridge the data science talent gap

#artificialintelligence

So much so that a recent report by Indeed identified a 344% increase in job postings for data scientists since 2013. This need comes at a time when data analytics is becoming mission-critical to more and more businesses. New data is constantly available, volumes are increasing and businesses need to use the data to drive deeper and more meaningful insights as they look to become more competitive. Data scientists are key to unlocking the story behind this data. These highly-skilled professionals interrogate and identify key patterns and trends within the data available to them, making a significant contribution to a company's overall performance.


The Rise of the Citizen Data Scientist

@machinelearnbot

The development of Big Data, artificial intelligence and predictive analytics has created extravagant expectations for enterprise productivity growth -- and aroused popular anxiety about intelligent information systems taking jobs from human workers. It is ironic, against that backdrop, that what is holding back widespread adoption of these technologies is, of all things, a manpower shortage. Big data and advanced analytics are the products of data science. What keeps companies from putting them to effective use is an acute shortage of data scientists. The US alone is facing a projected shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 data scientists by 2018.