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Intel Is Investigating How Confidential Data Ended Up Online

WIRED

Intel is investigating the purported leak of more than 20 gigabytes of its proprietary data and source code that a security researcher said came from a data breach earlier this year. The data--which at the time this post went live was publicly available on BitTorrent feeds--contains data that Intel makes available to partners and customers under NDA, a company spokeswoman said. Speaking on background, she said Intel officials don't believe the data came from a network breach. She also said the company is still trying to determine how current the material is and that, so far, there are no signs the data includes any customer or personal information. "We are investigating this situation," company officials said in a statement.


Intel Underfoot: Floor Sensors Rise as Retail Data Source

U.S. News

Sunglass Hut and fragrance maker Jo Malone use laser and motion sensors to tell when a product is picked up but not bought, and make recommendations for similar items on an interactive display. Companies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers in real time on a digital shelf or on their cellphones, said Jon Nordmark, CEO of Iterate Studio.


why-ryzen-threadripper-has-two-mysterious-chips.html#tk.rss_all

PCWorld

When famed overclocker der8baurer "delidded" AMD's highly anticipated Ryzen Threadripper in a video posted on Thursday, he got a surprise and spawned a mystery: Did AMD really waste two perfectly good 8-core chips to build Threadripper? So did AMD really waste two perfectly good "Zeppelin" dies? Rather than a single monolithic die, like Intel uses on its Core i9, AMD builds its Ryzen and Ryzen Threadripper CPUs using multiple chips connected with a high-speed fabric. The plastic plate is approximately the size of Intel's new Core i9 chip.